GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5217
By Special Request : Percy Faith and Robert Farnon
Percy Faith and his Orchestra
All arrangements by Percy Faith

1 Ride Through The Night (from "Subways Are For Sleeping") (Jule Styne)
Columbia CS 8533 1961
2 Carefree (Percy Faith)
Columbia CS 8360 1961
3 La Golondrina (The Swallow) (Traditional)
Columbia CS 8038 1957
4 Granada (Augustin Lara)
Columbia CS 8038 1957
5 Over And Over Again (from Billy Rose’s "Jumbo") (Richard Rodgers)
Columbia CS 8583 1962
6 Fascination (Fidenco Dante Marchetti)
Columbia CS 8124 1959
7 Sixteen Going On Seventeen (from "The Sound Of Music") (Richard Rodgers)
Columbia CS 8215 1960
8 Duet (Percy Faith)
Columbia CS 8481 1962
9 A Cock-Eyed Optimist (from "South Pacific") (Richard Rodgers)
Columbia CS 8005 1958
10 Chico Bolero (Percy Faith)
Columbia CS 8702 1962
11 Bess You Is My Woman Now (from "Porgy and Bess") (George Gershwin)
Columbia CS8105 1959
12 I Enjoy Being A Girl (from "Flower Drum Song") (Richard Rodgers)
Columbia CS 8583 1962

Robert Farnon and his Orchestra
(except where stated that Robert Farnon is conducting other orchestras)
All arrangements by Robert Farnon

13 The Girl On The Police Gazette (from the show "Star And Garter") (Irving Berlin)
(LP label credits ‘Jack Saunders Orchestra’)
Everest SDBR 1011 1958
14 Moon Over Hong Kong (featured in the film "The Road To Hong Kong") (Robert Farnon)
Liberty LOS 17002 1962
15 St. Patrick’s Day; The Gentle Maiden (Traditional)
Decca SKL 4096 1959
16 Seventh Heaven (Robert Farnon)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON (‘Melodi Light Orchestra Conducted by Ole Jensen’ on 78 label)
Chappell C 410 1952
17 All Sports March (Robert Farnon)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 339 1948
18 Tangerine (Victor Schertzinger; Johnny Mercer)
London BEP 6071 1955 (recorded 1952)
19 Blue Moment (Robert Farnon)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON (‘Melodi Light Orchestra Conducted by Ole Jensen’ on 78 label)
Chappell C 606 1958
20 Dominion Day (Robert Farnon)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 616 1958
21 In The Blue Of The Evening (original title "Footnote To A Summer Love") (Alec Wilder)
featuring FRANK REIDY, clarinet
Decca LK 4067 1953
22 City Streets (Robert Farnon)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 629 1959
23 The Touch Of Your Lips (Ray Noble)
Philips 852011 BY 1962
24 "Captain Horatio Hornblower, R.N." Title theme from the film (Robert Farnon)

THE LONDON FESTIVAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Delyse DS 6057 1960

Stereo tracks 1 – 15 & 23, 24; rest in mono

Canada’s largest city, Toronto, has the honour and distinction of being the birthplace of two of the 20th Century’s finest composer/conductor/arrangers in the world of Light Music. Ironically both of them achieved worldwide recognition and fame when they left their homeland and established their glittering careers in other countries. In the case of Percy Faith he responded to many offers of work and moved south of the border into the United States. Robert Farnon was sent to Britain during the Second World War, where he realised that the entertainment scene offered him more scope than back home to develop his skills. In each case they had been recognised in Canada for their music before they left, but it can be argued that they might not have achieved their universal acclaim had they not developed their careers elsewhere.

Percy Faith was born on 7 April 1908, the oldest of eight children. As a child he learned the violin and piano, and originally he expected that he would pursue his music career as a concert pianist. Aged only 15, he gave a piano recital at Toronto’s famous Massey Hall, but he injured his hands in a fire which forced him to turn to composing, arranging and conducting.

During the 1930s he was regularly heard in live music broadcasts on Canadian radio, and his programme "Music By Faith" was carried by the Mutual network in the USA, prompting offers of work south of the border. He eventually succumbed in 1940 and moved to Chicago, leaving Robert Farnon (previously his lead trumpeter) to conduct his Canadian orchestra. He became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1945.

Initially Faith concentrated on broadcasting, although he did make some commercial recordings for the Majestic, Decca and RCA labels, several of which have featured on previous Guild CDs. However, many other recordings, mainly derived from his radio programmes, were issued by Voice Of America on transcription discs, but these were not available to the general public. Some of them may now be heard on Guild GLCD5174 and GLCD5181. Things were to change dramatically when he signed a Columbia (CBS) contract in 1950 to provide backings for the label’s top singers which also allowed him to begin a regular programme of recording singles and albums of his own.

He soon discovered that his singles sold well and the new long playing records needed the kind of popular instrumental sounds that had formed the basis of his broadcasts for so many years. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Faith arranged all his own material, and his exciting and vibrant scores made his work stand out among the rest. He accompanied Columbia’s contract singers, and even contributed the odd popular song, such as My Heart Cries For You for Guy Mitchell. One of his best-selling singles was Theme from "A Summer Place" (on Guild GLCD5165) which is still frequently heard today. It won the Grammy Award for ‘Record Of The Year’ in 1961. A second Grammy followed in 1969 for his album Love Theme from "Romeo and Juliet".

Percy Faith’s recordings usually concentrated on the rich source of popular music of the time, which was available in abundance in musicals on Broadway and Hollywood films. But he also had a penchant for the exotic sounds of Latin-American music, and some of his best-selling collections featured his distinctive arrangements of the music of Mexico and Brazil. Like his fellow orchestra leaders, he had to acknowledge the changing tastes in popular music during the 1960s, and for a while he managed to attract a younger generation of listeners with albums devoted to lush orchestral versions of current song successes.

Although his recording career was always paramount, his composing and arranging abilities naturally attracted offers of work elsewhere. He composed the popular theme music for the television series "The Virginian", screened by NBC in the US and also shown in many countries around the world. In Hollywood he received an Academy Award nomination for his arrangements of the songs in the Doris Day film "Love Me Or Leave Me" (1955). Other Hollywood commissions included "Tammy Tell Me True" (1961), "I’d Rather Be Rich" (1964), "The Love Goddesses" (1964) and "The Third Day" (1965). The following year he provided a beautiful score for the much criticised film "The Oscar", although it did produce the song Maybe September which was recorded by Tony Bennett.

But today it is his numerous albums that have created a resurgence of interest in his work, thanks to their reissue on CD. Faith was always busy, whether working in the recording studios, radio, television or films. He died at Encino, California, on 9 February 1976, aged 67.

Percy Faith’s music has already been widely represented on Guild Light Music CDs. Some of the most memorable tracks include:

Blue Is The Night [GLCD5194] Brazil [GLCD5213] Brazilian Sleigh Bells [GLCD5105] Edelma [GLCD5182] Falling In Love With Love [GLCD5181] Fiddle Derby [GLCD5187] Go-Go-Po-Go [GLCD5199] Mademoiselle De Paris [GLCD5136] March Of The Toys [GLCD5159] Mucho Gusto [GLCD5214] Petite [GLCD5199] Show Me [GLCD5152] Swedish Rhapsody [GLCD5191] Temptation [GLCD5188] Theme from ‘A Summer Place’ [GLCD5165] Why Do I Love You [GLCD5181]

Robert Farnon was widely regarded as one of the world’s greatest composers of Light Orchestral music during the second half of the twentieth century. He was also revered as an arranger of quality popular songs, having influenced most of the top writers on both sides of the Atlantic. A great lover of jazz, two of his closest friends were trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and pianist Oscar Peterson.

Robert Joseph Farnon was born on 24 July 1917, and while still in his teens, he became a household name through his many programmes on radio, especially the long-running "Happy Gang". He occupied the lead trumpet chair in Percy Faith’s Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s Orchestra, also contributing vocal arrangements for the show. In 1940 Faith decided to leave for greener pastures in the USA, and Farnon was invited to take over the baton. World War 2 eventually interrupted his promising career, which had included the composition of two symphonies by the age of 25. It was as conductor of the Canadian Band of the Allied Expeditionary Forces that Farnon arrived in England in September 1944, working alongside Glenn Miller and George Melachrino, who fronted the American and British bands.

At the end of the war Farnon took his discharge in Britain, finding the musical scene more suited to his talents, so that he could work in films, radio and the recording industry. He realised that he had a talent for Light Music, but he did not confine himself to it. After all, he had been brought up in an atmosphere of big bands and show music. While living in Toronto he made frequent visits to New York, where he would call in at Minton’s, generally regarded as the birthplace of "bebop". It was not rare for him to be asked to join a jam session, with the likes of Dizzy and Oscar.

Farnon’s inventive ideas were soon noticed by British bandleaders Lew Stone, Ambrose and Ted Heath who were not slow to add Farnon scores to their libraries. Farnon joined the Geraldo Organisation as an arranger, and when Geraldo travelled to the USA in 1947 for a while Farnon took over the band for its broadcasts and recordings.

The Robert Farnon Orchestra began to appear regularly on BBC radio and television, both in its own programmes and also supporting big British stars such as Vera Lynn and Gracie Fields. Thanks to his radio broadcasts, British listeners were starting to notice the bright, fresh Farnon sound, and towards the end of 1948 Decca released one of the finest Light Music 78s ever recorded - "Jumping Bean" coupled with "Portrait Of A Flirt". These two Farnon originals have become part of the folk lore of British Light Music, and they undoubtedly influenced a generation of composers in this genre.

His first important film score was for "Spring In Park Lane" (1948), and it was hardly surprising when Warner Bros commissioned him to write the score for their prestigious maritime saga "Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N." (1951). The stars were Gregory Peck and Virginia Mayo, and Farnon’s score reflected the attraction they both felt for each other, as well as the many dramatic swashbuckling scenes throughout the film. The title music is the final track on this CD.

In 1962 cinema audiences saw the last film in the famous ‘Road’ series which had begun in Singapore way back in 1940. Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour were reunited for "The Road To Hong Kong" which was filmed at Shepperton Studios in England with Farnon as musical director. Some other major film scores included "Maytime In Mayfair" (1949), "Gentlemen Marry Brunettes" (1955), "The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw" (1958), "Shalako" (1968) and "Bear Island" (1979).

Although it has to be said that he never received the promotional support he deserved from his record company, his contract with Decca produced many fine albums which became models of orchestration. Leading international recording artists engaged him to arrange and conduct for them, such as Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan, Tony Bennett, Lena Horne and George Shearing. Farnon’s work has often been recognised by his peers. In Britain the foremost long-running recognition for excellence in the music industry are the Ivor Novello Awards. Farnon’s tally: "Westminster Waltz" in 1956; "Sea Shore" 1960; "Colditz March" 1973; and the major citation "Outstanding Services to British Music" in 1991. Across the Atlantic Farnon received Grammy nominations for arrangements in 1976 for "Sentimental Journey" (on a Singers Unlimited album) and in 1992 "Lush Life" (sung by Eileen Farrell). He finally reached the top for Best Instrumental Arrangement of 1995 - "Lament" on the J.J. Johnson album "Tangence". His importance was finally acknowledged by his homeland when he was awarded the Order of Canada early in 1998.

Robert Farnon lived on the beautiful island of Guernsey in the English Channel for almost half a century. He was still actively working on new composing and arranging projects right up until the time when he passed away peacefully on 23 April 2005, just three weeks before the premiere of his third symphony in Edinburgh.

The following compositions by Robert Farnon are a few of the fifty to be found on previous Guild CDs:

Derby Day [GLCD5160] Gateway To The West [GLCD5215] Goodwood Galop [GLCD5104] How Beautiful Is Night [GLCD5196] In A Calm [GLCD5112] Journey Into Melody [GLCD5214] Jumping Bean [GLCD5162] Malaga [GLCD5132] Manhattan Playboy [GLCD5175] Melody Fair [GLCD5170] Peanut Polka [GLCD5160] Pictures In The Fire [GLCD5212] Poodle Parade [GLCD5111] Portrait Of A Flirt [GLCD5120] Sea Shore [GLCD5180] A Star Is Born [GLCD5149] State Occasion [GLCD5178] Westminster Waltz [GLCD5158]

David Ades

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Light Music CDs. Some highly recommended releases.

Light Music is ignored by most Record Stores and Radio Stations, yet it is enjoyed by millions of people around the world.

You may know it as Easy Listening or Concert Music ... or maybe Middle-of-the Road. Whatever you happen to call it, Light Music offers relaxing enjoyment at any time of the day or night, and we hope that you will return regularly to this page in the Robert Farnon Society website to keep fully informed on the latest releases.

Releases up to December 2014

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"Melodies on the move"
Melodies on the move - CHRCD1CHRCD 1
This CD features 24 light and easy instrumental recordings from the vaults of Mozart Edition library.

Proceeds from the sale of this CD go to support Chichester Hospital Radio. More information here.

1 MERRY-GO-ROUND WALTZ
Alan Perry The Perry/Gardner Orchestra conducted by Alan Perry 2:12
2 LOVELY LIPS
Hans Wolf-Kraus Jack Wolfe and his Music 2:35
3 ON THE SMOOTH SIDE
Frank Chacksfield Antony Wood and his Orchestra 2:25
4 EL REMENDADO
Maurice van de Valle Armand Bernard and his Orchestra 2:25
5 MISS ANNA Louis Rey Detlef Rath and his Orchestra 2:51
6 SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
Ralf Heninger Antony Wood and his Orchestra 3:22
7 HIGHLAND HOLIDAY
Ralf Heninger Antony Wood and his Orchestra 2:33
8 OFF THE CUFF
Paul Fenhoulet Walt Peters and his Orchestra 2:36
9 SANTIAGO DE CHILE
Rudolf Maluck Orchestra Tropicana conducted by Lou Whiteson 4:26
10 LITTLE CLAUDIA
Carlos Diernhammer Jack Wolfe and his Music 1:59
11 IRISH IMP
William Gardner Antony Wood and his Orchestra 1:59
12 PHILOMENA
Hans Wolf-Kraus / Lothar Nakat Jack Wolfe and his Music 2:31
13 ON TWO CHORDS
Armand Bernard Armand Bernard and his Orchestra 2:23
14 SERENADE FOR LOVERS
Ralf Heninger Detlef Rath and his Orchestra 2:15
15 ALPINE STROLL
Louis Rey Antony Wood and his Orchestra 2:45
16 STRANGER IN THE NIGHT
Peter Thomas Peter Thomas and his Band 2:23
17 FUNNY HONEY
Carlos Diernhammer Jack Wolfe and his Music 2:22
18 TWILIGHT DREAMS
Albert Delroy Walt Peters and his Orchestra 4:06
19 JACKY’S WALTZ
Hans Wolf-Kraus Jack Wolfe and his Music 1:39
20 MAKIN’ HAY
Richard Toeman Walt Peters and his Orchestra 3:19
21 GOING STEADY
Conny Augustin Orchestra Raphaele conducted by Peter Walden 2:32
22 SOFTLY SWAYING
Harry Essex Antony Wood and his Orchestra 3:00
23 BLUE BLAZER Ralf Heninger Werner Eisbrenner and his Orchestra 1:56
24 BOMBA
Luis Gomez Orchestra Tropicana conducted by Lou Whiteson 2:12

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IAIN SUTHERLAND CONCERT ORCHESTRA
“Orient Express” - 20 Light Classics Alto ALC 1250“Orient Express” - 20 Light Classics
Alto ALC 1250

1. Waltz
2. Cockles and Mussels
3. Tea for Two
4. The Skaters' Waltz
5. Swedish Rhapsody
6. Tango
7. A Star Is Born
8. Fado
9. La Calinda
10. Gymnopedie No. 1
11. Procession of the Sardar
12. Automne
13. Praeludium
14. The Holy Boy
15. Tango: Jealousy
16. Humoresque
17. Czardas
18. Imtermezzo: Im Chambre Separée
19. Espana
20. Overture: Susannah's Secret

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5215
GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5215 "Song of the West"Song Of The West

1 Gateway To The West (Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM SE 3804 1960

2 "Bonanza" – Theme from the TV series (David Rose)
NELSON RIDDLE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Capitol ST 1869 1962

3 El Rancho Grande (My Ranch) (Silvano R Ramos, arr. Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8038 1957

4 Oklahoma! (Richard Rodgers)
THE MELACHRINO ORCHESTRA Conducted by GEORGE MELACHRINO
RCA LSP 2513 1962

5 Prairie Sail Car (from "Around The World In Eighty Days") (Victor Young)
THE CINEMA SOUND STAGE ORCHESTRA
Stereo Fidelity SF-2800 1958

6 Ranch House Party (from "Portrait Of A Frontier Town") (Don Gillis)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
Boosey & Hawkes O 2128 1948

7 Prairie Sunset (Ernest Tomlinson)
BOSWORTH ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BCV 1376 1962

8 Sioux War Dance (Ray Martin)
RAY MARTIN AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Columbia DB 2882 1951

9 Colorado Trail (Traditional, arr. Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM SE 3804 1960

10 Overland To Oregon – Suite (Trevor Duncan, real name Leonard Charles Trebilco)
Unidentified Orchestra
Impress IA 222 & 223 1960

11 Stampede (Herbert Leonard Stevens)
NEW CENTURY ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 042 1947

12 Frontier Marshall (Jack Beaver)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON (‘The Melodi Light Orchestra Conducted by Ole Jensen’ on record label)
Chappell C 586 1957

13 Pow Wow (Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LK 4119 1956

14 Tall In The Saddle (John Cacavas)
TELECAST ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 642 1959

15 Home On The Range (Traditional)
MANTOVANI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca SKL 4073 1959

16 Rocky Trail To A Peaceful Valley (Waters; Hall)
LEROY HOLMES AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM 863 1955

17 Prairie Rider (Charles Williams, arr. Cecil Milner)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by JACK LEON
Boosey & Hawkes O 2193 1950

18 Colorado Sunset (Jack Brown)
NEW CENTURY ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 050 1948

19 American Panorama (Wilfred Burns)
THE SYMPHONIA ORCHESTRA Conducted by CURT ANDERSEN
Charles Brull/Harmonic CBL 493 1962

20 California Here I Come (Buddy De Sylva; Joseph Meyer; Al Jolson)
HAL MOONEY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury SR 60047 1959

21 "High Noon" - Theme from the film (Dimitri Tiomkin)
DAVID CARROLL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury MG 20156 1956

22 Lazy Cowboy (Ruth Guthrie)
RAY MARTIN AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Columbia DB 3258 1953

23 Song Of The West (Billy Vaughn, arr. George Greeley)
BILLY VAUGHN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
DOT DLP 25442 1962

Stereo: tracks 1-5, 9, 10, 15, 20 & 23; rest in mono.

The honour of opening this collection goes to Robert Farnon, widely regarded by many as one of the finest composer/arranger/conductors of Light Music during the second half of the 20th century. Born in Toronto, Canada, Robert Joseph Farnon (1917-2005) is known for many of his catchy themes, notably Jumping Bean (on Guild GLCD5162) and Portrait of a Flirt (GLCD5120). In his later career he was in demand to arrange and conduct for major international stars such as Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan, Tony Bennett, Lena Horne and George Shearing. Gateway To The West is one of his earlier works, extolling his love of his native Canada. Later we hear his sensitive arrangement of the traditional folk melody Colorado Trail which contrasts strongly with another Farnon original Pow Wow.

David Rose (1910-1990) was one of the biggest names in American light music circles during the middle years of the 20th century. Born in London, England ‘lost’ him when the family moved to the USA when he was aged just four. A prolific composer and arranger, he contributed themes and incidental music to a number of top television shows, one of the most memorable being Bonanza. On this occasion the version by Nelson Riddle (1921-1985) has been selected, proving that this great American arranger and conductor’s talents extended far beyond the legendary work with Frank Sinatra which made him internationally famous.

Percy Faith (1908-1976) was also born in Toronto, Canada, and in 1940 he moved to the USA where he quickly established himself through radio and recordings. From the 1950s onwards his fame spread internationally, due to the great success of his numerous long playing albums. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Faith arranged all his own material, and his exciting and vibrant scores made his work stand out among the rest. His recordings prove that he had a love for Latin American music, and with El Rancho Grande he exploits his arranging talents to the full.

George Miltiades Melachrino (1909-1965) was one of the big names in British light music from the 1940s to the 1960s. Born in London, he became a professional musician, competent on clarinet, alto and tenor saxophone, violin and viola, and he worked with many British dance bands in the 1930s. After war service he built an orchestra which became one of the finest in the world; when long playing records arrived, Melachrino’s sold in vast quantities, especially in the USA. Many of his recordings featured the great songwriters of the day, such as Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) whose title music for Oklahoma! must be one of the most rousing numbers ever written to honour a US state.

Chicago-born Victor Young (1900-1956) enjoyed a successful career on Broadway and in Hollywood films, although his greatest triumph – the score for the film "Around The World In Eighty Days" – was completed shortly before his death, so he never knew that it gained him a posthumous Oscar. Young called the sequence featuring the Wild West Prairie Sail Car.

The American composer Donald Eugene Gillis (1912-1978) seemingly did not get the full attention from the American record industry which his talents deserved. It was the British Decca label that brought him to London in 1950 for several sessions at the Kingsway Hall which have preserved for posterity some of his best – and most quirky – creations. Anyone who can compose a piece of music called "Symphony No. 5½" is almost demanding not to be taken too seriously, and to make sure that nobody missed the joke Gillis subtitled his work "A Symphony For Fun". The first movement Perpetual Emotion is on Guild GLCD5156, while the third movement Scherzofrenia (GLCD5178) is also typical of the carefree, almost whimsical, work that he offered to music lovers in the middle years of the last century. This time the choice is his Ranch House Party from a suite called "Portrait Of A Frontier Town".

Ernest Tomlinson MBE (b.1924) is one of Britain’s most talented composers, working mainly in light music, but also highly regarded for his choral works and brass band pieces. During a very productive career, he has contributed numerous titles to the recorded music libraries of many different publishers, often under the pseudonym ‘Alan Perry’. In recent years Ernest has worked hard to preserve thousands of music manuscripts that would otherwise have been destroyed, and he is the President of the Light Music Society. Prairie Sunset is one of his numerous pieces of production music.

Raymond Stuart Martin (born Raymond Wolfgang Kohn in Vienna, 1918-1988) fled from the Nazis and settled in England before the outbreak of World War 2 where he became known as ‘Ray Martin’. He was one of the biggest names in British popular music during the 1950s, due to his work on radio, television, films and especially the recording studios. During the early part of his career he contributed several pieces to the Harmonic Mood Music Library. One of them was Sioux War Dance, and when it became noticed he made a commercial recording of it for Columbia – the EMI label that he would later manage for several of its most successful years in the mid-1950s. He returns just before our final track with Lazy Cowboy.

Trevor Duncan (real name Leonard Charles Trebilco, 1924-2005) was working as a BBC sound engineer when one of his first compositions, High Heels (on Guild GLCD5124) made the light music world sit up and take notice.Eventually his successful and prolific output mushroomed to such an extent that he had to give up his ‘day job’ at the BBC, and also find several different publishers simply because he was writing too much for just one to handle. This is illustrated by the fact that 36 of his works have already appeared on Guild Light Music CDs, and he was the featured composer in "Hall Of Fame Volume 2" (GLCD 5124). Although he wrote some catchy individual pieces, a good number of his contributions to mood music libraries were suites featuring several movements developing a distinctive main theme. One such commission was ‘Overland To Oregon’, and the separate parts have been edited together to form a continuous work. Duncan gave them the following descriptions: Main Theme, Frontier Town, Night Camp, Wagon Train, Crossing The Bighorn, Indian Country, Indian Attack, Beckoning Horizon.

Len Stevens(d. 1989 - his full name was Herbert Leonard Stevens) was a prolific British composer, contributing mood music to several different libraries, with a style that his admirers quickly grew to recognise. In common with so many of the talented musicians employed in the business, he could turn his hand to any kind of music that was needed, and he was also involved in the musical theatre. Stampede is his seventeenth Guild appearance, and it is one of the early recordings conducted by Sidney Torch (1908-1990) for the Francis, Day & Hunter mood music library.

Although little-remembered by most music lovers today, Jack Beaver (1900-1963), like the afore-mentioned Len Stevens, contributed far more music to the entertainment scene than was realised. Beaver worked at Gaumont-British Studios under Louis Levy during the 1930s, and was hired by Warner Bros. to run the music department at their British studio at Teddington in the early 1940s. His contributions to production music libraries (especially Chappell and Francis, Day & Hunter) were consistently of a high standard. Among some of the most notable are Picture Parade (GLCD5149), Cavalcade Of Youth (GLCD5195) and World Of Tomorrow (GLCD5135). Frontier Marshall is his sixteenth composition to be made widely available again on a Guild CD.

John Cacavas (1930-2014) was a prolific American composer, author and conductor, with over 1,500 titles to his credit. He has also worked widely in Britain and Europe, and in 1980 was elected president of the Composers and Lyricists Guild of America. His film scores include "Airport 1975", "Airport ‘77" and "Horror Express", as well as numerous TV series, notably "Kojak" and "Hawaii Five-O". He has contributed to several publishers’ mood music libraries, including Chappells - the source of his Tall In The Saddle. He remained active in the music business, dividing his time between homes in California and London.

Home On The Range is one of the best-loved traditional airs associated with the American West, and it receives a fine treatment by the world famous orchestra conducted by Annunzio Paolo Mantovani (1905-1980). Born in Venice, his family came to England when he was aged four and he was something of a prodigy on the violin by the time he reached sixteen. But he leaned more towards popular music, and fronted many different kinds of ensembles before long-playing records (especially when stereo arrived) brought him worldwide acclaim. Occasionally he orchestrated some of his music himself, but he built up a fine team of arrangers including Ronald Binge (1910-1979), Roland Shaw (1920-2012) and Cecil Milner (1905-1989). Unfortunately the one responsible for this piece has not been identified.

Leroy Holmes (born Alvin Holmes, 1913-1986) scored Hollywood films and radio programmes during his early career, before becoming one of the mainstays of MGM’s conducting ‘team’, also arranging many of their recordings. We are probably listening to his work in Rocky Trail To A Peaceful Valley. Eventually Holmes moved on to United Artists where he conducted many of their contract singers and also recorded albums under his own name. His screen credits include the films "The Bridge In The Jungle" (1970) and "Smile" (1975).

Londoner Charles Williams (born Isaac Cozerbreit 1893-1978) began his career accompanying silent films, then played violin under the batons of Beecham and Elgar. Right from the start of the ‘talkies’, he provided scores for numerous British movies, and his Dream Of Olwen (GLCD5192)is still remembered long after the film in which it appeared – "While I Live". By far the greatest volume of his composing skills was employed in mood music, providing hundreds of works for several libraries (especially Chappells), and over 40 have already been included on Guild CDs. On rare occasions his work was accepted by other libraries, and Prairie Rider is one of three pieces he wrote for Boosey & Hawkes.

Jackie Brown was one of Britain’s leading cinema organists, equally at home on large theatre consoles as well as their small electronic counterparts performed by enthusiasts at home. His output as a composer was relatively sparse, although light music aficionados regard his Metropolis (on Guild GLCD 5102) as one of the finest pieces of its kind. He worked on around a dozen films, and was the unseen conductor who used to direct the Billy Cotton Band for its television shows while Bill himself performed on-screen. Jackie also became a household name in Britain thanks to his regular appearances on Hughie Green’s (1920-1997) "Double Your Money" TV quiz show. Colorado Sunset is one of several pieces he wrote for the Francis, Day & Hunter mood music library.

Yet another busy composer employed by British production music publishers was Bernard Wilfred Harris, better known as ‘Wilfred Burns’ (1917-1990) with over 200 titles to his credit. After service during the Second World War he worked at Elstree studios before eventually becoming a freelance film composer and musical director. His first of over twenty films was around 1949, with his final score in the 1970s. His best-known was probably the large screen version of the popular BBC television series "Dad’s Army" in 1971. American Panorama is one of his many pieces accepted by various London publishers, and it is his eighth contribution to a Guild CD.

California Here I Come is usually played as a bright up-tempo number. Our version features the work of Harold (Hal) Mooney (1911-1995), an American composer, arranger and conductor who worked with most of the top bands and singers during a long career. It demonstrates how a fresh approach to a familiar and often hackneyed melody can be given fresh life in the hands of an expert arranger.

The familiar theme from the film "High Noon" is conducted by David Carroll (1913-2008 – real name Rodell Walter ‘Nook’ Schreier) who was well-known in his native USA as a conductor and arranger. In the mid-1940s he joined the newly formed Mercury Records where he spent the next 15 years. Initially employed as an arranger and conductor, he progressed to being a producer and was later promoted as head of artists and repertoire.

Last on the podium this time, with the title track for this collection, is Richard ‘Billy’ Vaughn (1919-1991), born in Glasgow, Kentucky, who began his career playing piano and singing baritone in the group ‘The Hilltoppers’, before joining Dot Records as musical director where he accompanied many of the label’s top singers. In 1965 he began touring internationally with his band, achieving considerable popularity in Japan, Korea and Brazil. His own composition Song Of The West receives a suitably dramatic interpretation by George Greeley (born Georgio Guariglia, 1917-2007) who was an American pianist, conductor and composer working extensively in films and television. During his early career he arranged for popular bandleaders such as Tommy Dorsey. In the 1950s he was a staff pianist at Columbia Pictures, and received particular praise for his work on "On The Waterfront" (1954) and "The Eddy Duchin Story" (1956). In later years he performed as piano soloist and guest conductor with leading orchestras in many countries.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5216

GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5216 "Springtime"Springtime

1 The First Day Of Spring (Leroy Anderson) LEROY ANDERSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Brunswick STA 3030 1960

2 April Is Coming (Assi Rahbani; Mansour Rahbani, arr. Ron Goodwin)
RON GOODWIN AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Parlophone PCS 3028 1962

3 Tip Toe Through The Tulips With Me (Joseph A. Burke; Al Dubin)
FRANK CHACKSFIELD AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LK 4135 1956

4 Blossom (Mark Charlap, real name Morris Isaac Charlip)
RICHARD HAYMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury MG 20048 1954

5 Spring In Baden Baden (Frühling In Baden-Baden) (Lothar Brühne)
BADEN-BADEN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conducted by HANS ROSBAUD
Ariola 36 809 C 1958

6 Springtime (Also known as "Love’s Springtime") (Cedric King Palmer)
THE BOSWORTH ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BCV 1274 1961

7 Mayflies (Edward Stanelli)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by DOLF VAN DER LINDEN (‘Nat Nyll’ on disc label)
Boosey & Hawkes O 2289 1957

8 Spring Cruise (Peter Yorke)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON (‘Melodi Light Orchestra Conducted by Ole Jensen’ on disc label)
Chappell C 417 1952

9 Spring Gambol (Harold Smart)
THE LIGHT SYMPHONIA Conducted by ROBERTO CAPELLI
Conroy BM 270 1961

10 Mother Nature (Harry Rabinowitz)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by DOLF VAN DER LINDEN (‘Nat Nyll’ on disc label)
Boosey & Hawkes O 2344 1959

11 Garden Party (George French)
L’ORCHESTRE DEVEREAUX Conducted by GEORGES DEVEREAUX
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 1205 1953

12 Those Far Away Hills (Reginald King)
REGENT CLASSIC ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BC 1230 1949

13 Spring Promenade (Frederic Curzon)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CEDRIC DUMONT
Boosey & Hawkes OT 2336 1958

14 Rainbow’s Glory (Cedric King Palmer)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS METROPOLE ORCHESTRA
Paxton PR 584 1954

15 High Cloud (Herbert Leonard Stevens)
CRAWFORD LIGHT ORCHESTRA (probably STUTTGART RADIO ORCH)
Josef Weinberger Theme Music JW 131-A 1957

16 Spring Fashion (Alan Braden)
GROUP-FORTY ORCHESTRA Conducted by LAURIE JOHNSON
KPM 052 1960

17 Spring Song (Haydn Wood)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CHARLES WILLIAMS
Chappell C 214 1945

18 Prelude For Gardenias (Peter Barrington, real name Felton Rapley)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by JACK LEON
Boosey & Hawkes OT 2195 1950

19 Forest Mood (Frederic Bayco)
THE BOSWORTH ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BCV 1359 1961

20 June Is Calling (Wilfrid Sanderson)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by JAY WILBUR
Boosey & Hawkes O 2004 1944

21 April Kiss (Peter Dennis, real name Dennis Alfred Berry)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS METROPOLE ORCHESTRA
Paxton PR 527 1952

22 (I’ll Be With You) In Apple Blossom Time (Fleetson; Albert Von Tilzer)
ERNEST MAXIN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Top Rank BUY 020 1960

23 Sunbeams And Butterflies (Albert William Ketèlbey)
ELITE NOVELTY ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BC 1062 1938

24 We’ll Gather Lilacs (from "Perchance To Dream") (Ivor Novello, arr. Sidney Torch)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CHARLES WILLIAMS
BBC London Transcription Service 12PH 32255/6 1945

25 Beautiful Spring (Paul Lincke)
LONDON PROMENADE ORCHESTRA Conducted by ERIC ROGERS
Decca LF 1166 1954

Stereo: tracks 1 & 2; rest in mono.

Leroy Anderson(1908-1975) is probably the best-loved American light music composer of his generation. For many years he was the chief arranger for the Boston Pops, and its famous conductor Arthur Fiedler introduced many Anderson novelties to an appreciative world. Leroy’s contribution to this collection is simply the composer’s paean of praise for what many regard as the most welcome season of the year, since it ushers in the warmer and lighter days that are so refreshing after the long, gloomy winter months. The First Day Of Spring is certainly greeted by many with eager anticipation, and it can’t arrive too soon!

Ronald (Ron) Alfred Goodwin (1925-2003) was a brilliant British composer, arranger and conductor, who rose to prominence in Britain during the 1950s through a series of recordings that revealed a fresh and vibrant style of light music that greatly appealed to the public. His ability to arrange and compose soon resulted in commissions to work in films, and popular movies like "633 Squadron" (1964), "Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines" (1965) and Alfred Hitchcock’s "Frenzy" (1972) which introduced him to a worldwide audience. April Is Coming was featured in an album of music associated with Lebanon.

Frank (Francis Charles) Chacksfield (1914-1995) conducted one of the finest light orchestras in the world, and during his long recording career with Decca alone, it is estimated that his albums sold more than 20 million copies. Tip Toe Through The Tulips has been popular ever since it first appeared in the 1929 movie musical "Gold Diggers of Broadway".

Richard Warren Joseph Hayman (1920-2014) as well as being a respected arranger and conductor, was also a harmonica virtuoso, and he sometimes adapted his scores of popular melodies so that he could perform on his favourite instrument (he can be heard in Blossom in this collection). He followed Leroy Anderson as an arranger for the Boston ‘Pops’ Orchestra over a period of more than 30 years, and also served as Music Director of Mercury Records. He was regularly in demand to orchestrate Broadway shows and film soundtracks, and notable among his own compositions are No Strings Attached (GLCD5105) and Skipping Along (GLCD5131). His recordings reissued on Guild now total 26.

Lothar Brühne (1900-1958) was a German composer who seems to have specialised in writing for films. His work has already been featured on Guild GLCD5135 (the exuberant Sport And Music for the Bosworth Mood Music Library), and this time he provides the charming Frühling in Baden-Baden.

Cedric King Palmer (1913-1999) was born in Eastbourne, on the south coast of England; he chose not to use his first name professionally. He became a prolific composer of mood music contributing over 600 works during a period of 30 years to the recorded music libraries of several London publishers. He was able to adapt his writing to many different styles, and our title track Springtime and Rainbow’s Glory find him in a reflective, lyrical mood.

Edward Stanelli (real name Edward Stanley De Groot, 1895-1961) was a British composer and comedian who may still be remembered by some people for his "Hornchestra", constructed from a weird collection of electric and bulb motor horns on which he played jazz music. He demonstrated this device on 2 April 1937 when he made his television debut from Alexandra Palace in London. During his early career it seemed that his future was on the concert platform, both as a conductor and violinist. But such was his popularity with audiences in 1930s music halls that he tended to rely upon comedy rather than a ‘serious’ career in music. Happily he did not completely ignore his talents as a composer: in this collection he is represented with Mayflies, and his longer work Atlantis has previously appeared on Guild GLCD5118 as part of a compilation appropriately titled "Buried Treasures".

Peter Yorke (1902-1966) worked with many leading British bands during his formative years, some of the most notable being Percival Mackey, Jack Hylton and Henry Hall. Later on he conducted one of Britain’s most popular broadcasting orchestras from the 1940s until the 1960s. Peter Yorke was also a gifted composer and he created many stunning arrangements that brought out some fine performances from the top musicians he always employed. Spring Cruise is one of many works he contributed to British production music libraries, and it is his nineteenth composition to be included on a Guild CD.

During the middle years of the last century Harold Smart was well known in Britain as a popular organist. He was usually associated with the Hammond Organ, and followed in the footsteps of his famous father Charles Smart, with whom he sometimes performed. Harold excelled at recordings in strict dance tempo throughout, but he does not appear to have been a prolific composer. Therefore it is nice to be able to hear his Spring Gambol, which reveals another aspect of his considerable talents.

Harry Rabinowitz MBE (born Johannesburg, South Africa 1916) came to England in 1946 and was employed by the BBC, first as a pianist then as conductor of the BBC Revue Orchestra. In the 1970s he was Head of Music for London Weekend Television, and he also conducted a number of film scores. His composition Mother Nature is his seventh on a Guild CD; sometimes he wrote under the pseudonym ‘Andy Thurlow’.

George French (born Bentley, Yorkshire, 1921) was a British violinist who broadcast frequently on the BBC in the happy times of the last century when radio stations actually employed ‘live’ musicians. He contributed to many popular series ("Music While You Work" being one prime example) and performed (often as leader) for most of the well-known conductors. He also had a gift for composing, and Garden Party is his fifth appearance on a Guild CD.

Reginald Claude McMahon King (1904-1991) was an accomplished pianist, who performed under the baton of Sir Henry Wood at the Proms soon after he completed his studies at London’s Royal Academy. In 1927 he took his orchestra into Swan & Edgar’s restaurant at their Piccadilly Circus store, where they remained until the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. During this period he also started broadcasting regularly (his total number of broadcasts exceeded 1,400), and he made numerous recordings, often featuring his own attractive compositions. Once again we feature him as a contributor to one of London’s production music libraries with Those Far Away Hills, his ninth composition on Guild.

London-born Frederic Curzon (1899-1973) was a charming, unassuming man who devoted his early career to working in the theatre, and like so many of his contemporaries he gradually became involved in providing music for silent films. As well as being a fine pianist and conductor, he also played the organ, and his first big success as a composer was his "Robin Hood Suite" in 1937. This encouraged him to devote more of his time to writing and broadcasting, and several of his works have become light music ‘standards’, notably March Of The Bowmen (from "Robin Hood Suite") on GLCD5106, and The Boulevardier (GLCD5177). Frederic Curzon was eventually appointed Head of Light Music at London publishers Boosey and Hawkes (where his Spring Promenade originated), and for a while was also President of the Light Music Society.

Len Stevens(d. 1989) (his full name was Herbert Leonard Stevens) was a prolific British composer, contributing mood music to several different libraries, with a style that his admirers quickly grew to recognise. In common with so many of the talented musicians employed in the business, he could turn his hand to any kind of music that was needed, and he was also involved in the musical theatre. High Cloud comes from the Josef Weinberger mood music library.

For around three decades from the 1960s onwards Alan Braden was a familiar name on British Television as the musical director for many top variety shows. He also arranged and composed a fair amount of the music involved, although he was not always credited. Spring Fashion was one of his early works for the new KPM Music Library.

Yorkshireman Haydn Wood(1882-1959) enjoyed much success during the early years of the last century with ballads, before concentrating on full scale orchestral works and suites. Roses of Picardy has been in the repertoire of most singers of the 20th century (even Frank Sinatra!), and that alone should justify Haydn Wood’s place among the great popular composers. Recent recordings of his works have demonstrated the depth and wide scope of his composing abilities, especially in suites. Spring Song is a delicate tone poem that rivals the works of many of his peers.

Edmund Felton Rapley, ARCM, (1907-1976) graduated from being a church organist in Gosport, to a familiar name on the BBC especially during the 1940s and 1950s. His own pieces included the Overture Down The Solent (on Guild GLCD 5140) and the catchy Peacock Patrol (written under the pseudonym ‘Peter Barrington’) on GLCD 5143. He wears his ‘Barrington’ hat again for Prelude For Gardenias.

London-born Frederic Bayco (sometimes spelt Fredric, 1913-1970) was an organist and composer who contributed pieces to several recorded music libraries. He was born in London, and attended Brighton School of Music. Later he was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists. Many of his compositions have an historic or martial feel, although the inspiration for Forest Mood is simply the beauty of nature. During the 1960s he was Chairman of The Light Music Society.

Wilfred (Wilfrid) Ernest Sanderson (1878-1935) was the son of a Wesleyan Methodist minister. Although born in Ipswich, he was educated in London, and from 1895 to 1904 studied the organ as pupil assistant under Frederick Bridge at Westminster Abbey. Thereafter he appears to have based himself in the Yorkshire town of Doncaster, where he was Organist of the Parish Church from 1904 to 1923. This seems to have been his most productive period as a composer; in total he wrote around 170 ballads and several short piano pieces. He died in Nutfield, Surrey, from typhoid at the relatively early age of 56.

Peter Dennis hides the true identity of Londoner Dennis Alfred Berry (1921-1994), who also composed (sometimes in collaboration with others) under pseudonyms such as Frank Sterling, Charles Kenbury and Michael Rodney. For part of the 1950s he ran the Paxton library (from which comes April Kiss), but at the same time he also contributed titles to other publishers. Eventually he was asked by Southern Music to launch their new Mood Music Library which issued its first recordings on 78s in 1960.

In Britain Ernest Maxin became known in the 1960s and 1970s for his work as producer and director of many popular television programmes. He also made a few recordings (he has already appeared on a previous Guild CD with No Orchids For My Lady - GLCD5182), but whether or not he actually had a hand in arranging and/or conducting the music is hard to discover. His contribution to this CD is the popular song (I’ll Be With You) In Apple Blossom Time.

Albert William Ketèlbey (1875-1959), born in the Lozells area of Birmingham, was a highly successful composer, who earned the equivalent of millions of pounds during the peak of his popularity. Pieces such as In a Monastery Garden (GLCD5182), The Phantom Melody, In a Persian Market (GLCD5120) and Bells Across the Meadow (GLCD5108)brought him international fame, no doubt assisted by his enthusiastic participation in the rapidly growing business of producing gramophone records. Many of his works were chosen by London publishers Bosworth & Co. for their mood music library, and Sunbeams And Butterflies is an early example in their catalogue.

Ivor Novello (born David Ivor Davies 1893-1951) was a Welsh composer, singer and actor who created some of the most popular shows in London’s West End during the first half of the last century. One of these was "Perchance To Dream" from which comes We’ll Gather Lilacs In The Spring Again… The melody is so good that it happily survives without the familiar lyrics, although our version is considerably enhanced with a superb arrangement by Sidney Torch (1908-1990). It seems he never recorded this commercially, so we are fortunate that a transcription disc of a BBC broadcast from 1945 has survived. Apart from many of his songs which have become standards, Ivor Novello continues to be remembered for the annual awards which bear his name, held in London each Spring.

The German composer Carl Emil Paul Lincke (born in Berlin 1866-1946) worked as a theatre conductor and music publisher in Berlin around the turn of the century. He spent two years in Paris as musical director of the famous Folies-Bergère, but then returned to Berlin, where he conducted at the Apollo Theatre. A versatile musician, he started with the violin, changed to the bassoon and then finally to the piano. He became known around the world for his Glow Worm (on Guild GLCD5106 & 5143), but this was just one number in a large body of musical works. He was generally considered to be ‘the father of Berlin operetta’, putting him (in German speaking countries, at least) on a par with Johann Strauss and Franz Lehar. His Beautiful Spring provides a fitting finale to this seasonal collection.

 

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5213

Light And Latin

1 Malaguena (Ernesto Lecuona)
WERNER MÜLLER AND HIS ORCHESTRA (as ‘Ricardo Santos’)
Polydor 224 002 SEPH 1960
2 Baia (Na Baixa do Sapateiro) (Ary Barroso, arr. Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8622 1962
3 Cuban Love Song (Jimmy McHugh; Dorothy Fields; Herbert Stothart)
PAUL WESTON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CL 572 1954
4 Tico Tico (Zequinha de Abreu)
CARMEN DRAGON Conducting THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL SYMPHONY
Capitol P 8314 1957
5 Poinciana (Nat Simon; Buddy Bernier)
XAVIER CUGAT AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury CMS 18046 1961
6 Duerme (Time Was) (Miguel Prado)
TITO PUENTE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LSP 1479 1957
7 High In Sierra (Ernesto Lecuona)
STANLEY BLACK AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca SKL 4011 1958
8 I Love You (from "Mexican Hayride") (Cole Porter, arr, Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Jack Saunders’ on disc label)
Everest SDBR 1011 1958
9 Brazil (Aquarela do Brasil) (Ary Barroso, arr. Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8622 1962
10 Beguine By Night (Eric Winstone)
GROUP-FORTY ORCHESTRA
KPM Music KPM 070 1960
11 Adios (Enric Madriguera)
ANDRE KOSTELANETZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia ML 4082 1948
12 No Te Importe Saber (René Touzet, arr. Laurie Johnson)
AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA WITH STRINGS Conducted by LAURIE JOHNSON
MGM E 3478 1957
13 Berceuse Cubaine (Frank Engelen)
THE BRUSSELS NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Southern MQ 516 1960
14 Oracion Caribe (Agustin Lara, arr. Mario Ruiz Armengol)
MARIO RUIZ ARMENGOL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LPM 1292 1956
15 Nightingale (Xavier Cugat)
XAVIER CUGAT AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury PPS 6003 1961
16 Noche De Ronda (Be Mine Tonight) (Maria Toroso Lara)
TITO PUENTE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LSP 1479 1957
17 Quiet Village (Les Baxter)
CLEBANOFF STRINGS AND PERCUSSION
Mercury SR 60689 1961
18 Brazilian Butterfly (Ronald Hanmer)
THE CONNAUGHT LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Conroy BM 245 1960
19 Sweet Bolero (Hermann Garst)
EDDIE BARCLAY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury MG 20265 1955
20 The Moon Of Manakoora (from the film "The Hurricane") (Frank Loesser; Alfred Newman)
AXEL STORDAHL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Dot DLP 25282 1960
21 Cordoba (from "Cantos Dos Espana") (Isaac Albéniz)
ANDRE KOSTELANETZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8968 1962
22 Adios Mariquita Linda (Marcos A. Jiminez)
DENNIS FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Oriole SEP 7063 1962
23 Siboney (Ernesto Lecuona)
STANLEY BLACK AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca SKL 4011 1958
24 Tropical Merengue (Rafael Merdina Munoz)
RICHARD HAYMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury SR 60000 1958
25 Espana (Emmanuel Chabrier)
CARMEN DRAGON Conducting THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL SYMPHONY
Capitol P 8275 1955

Stereo tracks: 1, 2, 4-9, 15-17 & 20-25; rest in mono

Just as no two music lovers will probably ever agree on the precise boundaries that define Light Music, the aficionados of Latin American will also happily argue about its origins. There seems little doubt that most will accept that the vast continent of the Americas, from Mexico southwards, qualifies as being generally regarded as ‘Latin America’, so the rhythms and styles of more than twenty countries have contributed to its emergence – particularly from the 1930s onwards – as an enjoyable part of the popular music scene. Add to this the influence of music makers from the United States and Europe, and the result is a mix that may sometimes have corrupted the roots, but has succeeded in making what we all regard as ‘Latin American Music’ universally popular. It is therefore hardly surprising that many light orchestras have included it in their repertoire; some have even embraced it wholeheartedly.

During the 1950s the Ricardo Santos Orchestra became familiar to lovers of Latin American music. Eventually the secret came out, that ‘Ricardo Santos’ was actually the prolific German bandleader Werner Müller (1920-1998). Originally a bassoonist, he became the first conductor of the RIAS (Radio In American Sector) Dance Band based in Berlin, but it was not long before Müller began to realise that the public’s love affair with the swing era was gradually starting to wane. Sixteen strings were added to the line-up, and his orchestra built up a strong following through its Polydor recordings. Recognising the public’s appetite for LA music, he also recorded under the pseudonym ‘Ricardo Santos’ when playing Latin American music, and his fame spread far beyond the borders of his native Germany. Malaguena is a good example of the often flamboyantans Geoth style he adopted, using ‘cascading strings’ to enhance the infectious rhythms.

From his earliest days in the recording studios the Canadian conductor Percy Faith (1908-1976) revealed his passion for Latin American music. When LPs arrived two of his most popular albums featured music from Mexico and Brazil, and his contributions to this CD - Baia and Brazil - come from the latter.

The American conductor Paul Weston (born Paul Wetstein, 1912-1996) also fully embraced the opportunities offered by the longer playing time of the LP. His ‘concept’ albums helped to set standards that others would try to emulate, and his early days in the world of the top dance bands (especially Tommy Dorsey) taught him the advantages offered by including a strong brass section to counterbalance the strings. Cuban Love Song certainly benefits from the rich sound of the brass, lifting the melody to a new level.

Carmen Dragon (1914-1984) conducts the Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra in two impressive performances: the popular Tico Tico and Chabrier’s famous Espana, which illustrates how the strong influence of Spain permeates so much Latin American music. Dragon was born in Antioch, California. His first success in Hollywood was collaborating with Morris Stoloff (1898-1980) arranging Jerome Kern’s score for the 1944 Rita Hayworth/Gene Kelly film "Cover Girl" which secured him an Oscar. He worked extensively in radio and television, and was a frequent visitor to recording studios conducting the Hollywood Bowl and Capitol Symphony Orchestras.

Xavier Cugat (1900-1990) was a Spanish born bandleader who spent his formative years in Havana, but achieved fame in the USA. He provided the resident orchestra at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria before and after the Second World War, and he was also a cartoonist and successful businessman. His four marriages provided fodder for gossip columnists, but his lasting legacy is appearances in several Hollywood films and many fine recordings of Latin American music. He first appears on this CD with Poinciana, then conducting his own composition Nightingale.

Ernesto Antonio ‘Tito’ Puente (1923-2000) was born and raised in the Spanish Harlem district of New York City. As a child the influence of Gene Krupa made him choose percussion to express his musical ideas, although there was a serious musician waiting to be discovered. After war service in the US Navy he attended the Julliard School of Music where he studied conducting, orchestration and musical theory. Through his albums, particularly during the 1950s, he attempted a fusion of Jazz with Latin American music, but he also concentrated on dance styles earning the accolade ‘King of the Mambo’. Adding strings to his usual line-up seemed a natural progression, with pleasing results: his Guild debut features his unique versions of Duerme (better known as Time Was) and Noche De Ronda (Be Mine Tonight).

Londoner Stanley Black (born Solomon Schwartz 1913-2002) was successful in many areas of music during his long career which began in his teens. While playing piano in Harry Roy’s dance band, during a tour of South America he became keen on Latin-American music, and several of his fine light orchestral albums focussed on this repertoire. His two numbers in this collection are both by the famous Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona (1895-1963) – High In Sierra and the more familiar Siboney.

Cole Porter’s I Love You is another track taken from the 1958 recording sessions at Walthamstow Town Hall in London, first featured in Guild’s "Strings And Things Go Stereo" collection (GLCD 5153). At the behest of Elizabeth Taylor, this involved an album of melodies associated with shows and films produced by her late husband, Mike Todd. Robert Farnon (1917-2005) was engaged to arrange and conduct his orchestra, although his name could not appear on the album for contractual reasons.

Eric Winstone (born in London, 1915-1974) was one of Britain’s leading dance band leaders, who in his younger days was a virtuoso piano-accordionist. He could also compose attractive light music, sometimes with a humorous twist – as in The Happy Hippo (on Guild GLCD5157). This time we hear him in a slightly more exotic mood in Beguine By Night.

Andre Kostelanetz (born in St. Petersburg, Russia 1901-1980) became one of the biggest names in American light orchestral music during the middle years of the 20th Century. His broadcasts and recordings were enjoyed by millions. It was his passion to ‘educate’ his audience to enjoy fine music, and his wide repertoire also extended to Latin American, from which we can enjoy Adios and Cordoba.

Laurie Johnson (b.1927) has been a leading figure on the British entertainment scene for 50 years. A gifted arranger and composer, Laurie has contributed to films, musical theatre, radio, television and records, with his music used in many well-known productions such as "The Avengers" and "The Professionals". Early in his career he was asked by MGM to make a series of recordings as conductor and arranger, but at the time the bandleader Ambrose was still well-known, so it was his name that appeared on the labels. No Te Importe Saber was included on an LP of Latin-American melodies.

The writer of Berceuse Cubaine was Frank Engelen, a Belgian guitarist who was also highly respected as a composer and arranger.

Don Mario Ruiz Armengol (1914-2002) has been compared by some musicologists as being Mexico’s equivalent of David Rose, and his arrangements (such as Oracion Caribe) do contain certain snatches of Rose’s unique style. During the middle years of the last century he was regarded as Mexico’s foremost arranger and conductor of popular music, as well as one of its leading composers. From the 1930s onwards RCA used him to accompany many of the contract artists on their Mexican subsidiary label, and he also worked extensively in radio and films. He gradually became known across the border in the USA, where none other than Duke Ellington is reported to have dubbed him "Mr. Harmony".

In 1951 Les Baxter (1922-1996) wrote and recorded Quiet Village which he described as follows: "The jungle grows more dense as the river boat slowly makes its way into the deep interior. A snake slithers into the water, flushing a brilliantly plumaged bird who soars into the clearing above a quiet village. Here is a musical portrait of a tropical village deserted in the mid-day heat." Other arrangers and conductors were attracted to this piece in later years, and the choice for this CD is by Chicago-born Herman Clebanoff (1917-2004). He had a sound education in classical music and was an experienced violinist and concertmaster before he was 20. Usually just known as ‘Clebanoff’, he had a long association with NBC, and from 1945 he spent the next ten years as concertmaster of their Chicago-based orchestra, playing a wide repertoire from the classics to popular tunes. Mercury’s Chicago music director David Carroll (real name Rodell Walter ‘Nook’ Schreier 1913-2008) signed him to the label, and in 1960 Clebanoff moved to Los Angeles when Mercury consolidated their recording activities in Hollywood.

Ronald Hanmer (1917-1994) could make a legitimate claim to being the most prolific of all the composers featured on this CD. His career stretched from the 1930s (he was a cinema organist) until the end of his life, and over 700 of his compositions were published in various background music libraries (examples already on Guild include Proud and Free GLCD5136, The Four Horsemen and Intermission – both onGLCD5140). He was also kept busy as an arranger, and the bandleader Edmundo Ros (1910-2011) used many of his pieces. Hanmer’s Brazilian Butterfly is close to the style that made Ros’s Latin American music so popular in Britain in post-war years. Among his film scores were Made in Heaven (1952), Penny Princess (1952) and Top of the Form (1953). He was also in demand as an orchestrator of well-known works for Amateur Societies, and the brass band world was very familiar with his scores – sometimes used as test pieces. In 1975 he emigrated to Australia, where he was delighted to discover that his melody Pastorale (on Guild GLCD5212) was famous throughout the land as the theme for the long-running radio serial Blue Hills. In 1992 Ronald Hanmer received the Order of Australia for services to music, just before that country abolished the honours system.

Sweet Bolero introduces Eddie Barclay(1921-2005)(real name Edouard Ruault – he changed it in 1944 when he came into contact with American liberation forces) who was famous in France for two reasons: his music, and his nine wives. His career took off at the end of World War 2 when he realised that his jazz with a French flavour was much in demand. He launched what he claimed to be the first discothèque, Eddie's Club, based on the American clubs that had opened to serve US military personnel, and started his own band in 1947. Gradually he began expanding his talents into conducting and record production for several leading singers, and eventually he formed Barclay Records. Thanks to his contacts with the American record industry he was able to take a leading role in the production and distribution of LP records in France where he became known as the ‘king of microgroove’.

The Moon Of Manakoora is conducted by Axel Stordahl (1913-1963) who will be familiar to many collectors of American popular music, mainly through his backing for Frank Sinatra during a period known as the singer’s ‘Columbia years’. In 1936 he joined Tommy Dorsey as a trumpet player, and was encouraged to develop his arranging talents. He realised that his style was more suited to slow, sentimental ballads, which became his trademark. In partnership with Paul Weston, he composed Day by Day, but during his later career he tended to concentrate on leading studio bands for radio and television.

Adios Mariquita Linda comes from a very rare stereo EP conducted by Dennis Farnon (b. 1923), who is the youngest of the three talented Canadian Farnon brothers; the first was Brian (1911-2010) and the second – the most famous of the three – was Robert Farnon (1917-2005). Dennis worked for ten years in Hollywood where his screen credits included the music for 12 ‘Mr. Magoo’ cartoons, and four humorous animated ‘Art’ films. For three years he was Artist and West Coast Album Director for RCA Records, and was one of the five founders in 1957 of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, who present the annual Grammy awards. His conducting and arranging assignments included albums with Harry Belafonte, Tony Martin, Gogi Grant, George Shearing and the Four Freshmen. Among his own LPs are ‘Caution Men Swinging’, ‘Enchanted Woods’ (from which comes his unusual, yet appealing arrangement of Cecelia on Guild GLCD5165) and ‘Magoo in Hi-Fi’. He came to Europe in 1962, and worked on TV series such as ‘Bat Out Of Hell’, ‘Spy Trap’ and ‘Bouquet of Barbed Wire’. He scored the 1966 Tony Curtis film "Drop Dead Darling" which was renamed "Arrivederci Baby" for its US release. Although officially retired, Dennis now lives in The Netherlands, where he continues to compose and teach.

Richard Warren Joseph Hayman (b. 1920) started at the age of 18 as a harmonica player in Borrah Minevitch’s Harmonica Rascals, but he decided to concentrate more on arranging and conducting. He worked on the MGM musical "Meet Me In St. Louis" and was put under contract by Mercury Records in 1950, for whom he made many singles and albums, the best-seller being his version of Ruby from the film "Ruby Gentry". He also arranged for the Boston Pops, serving as back-up conductor for Arthur Fiedler. Tropical Merengue is another example of Hayman’s ability to adapt to a wide range of musical styles. Which is a statement that can equally apply to many of the famous conductors represented in this collection.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5214

The Composer Conducts – Volume 3

1 Mucho Gusto (Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8439 1961
2 Someday (from "The Vagabond King") (Rudolf Friml)
101 STRINGS Conducted by RUDOLF FRIML
Stereo Fidelity SF-6900 1959
3 Clarinet Candy (Leroy Anderson)
LEROY ANDERSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Soloists: Vincent J. Abato; Herbert S. Blayman; Roger Hiller; Bernard Portnoy
Brunswick STA 8524 1962
4 Aries (Hal Mooney)
HAL MOONEY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury SR 60073 1958
5 El Caballero (Richard Hayman)
RICHARD HAYMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury SR 60103 1959
6 A Frenchman In New York (David Rose)
DAVID ROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM E 3481 1957
7 "The Village Of Daughters" (Theme from the film) (Ron Goodwin)
RON GOODWIN AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Parlophone 45-R 4892 1962
8 Boy Meets Girl (Meredith Willson)
MEREDITH WILLSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Brunswick LA 8628 1953
9 Happiness Day (Roger Roger)
ROGER ROGER AND HIS CHAMPS ELYSEES ORCHESTRA
Chappell C 516 1955
10 "The Moonraker" (Theme from the film) (Laurie Johnson)
LAURIE JOHNSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
HMV 45-POP 404 1957
11 Sound And Vision – Associated TeleVision March (Eric Coates)
ERIC COATES AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Pye Nixa N 15003 1955
12 Romantic Mood (Walter Stott)
TELECAST ORCHESTRA Conducted by WALTER STOTT
Chappell C 728 1961
13 Here They Are (Hans May)
HARMONIC ORCHESTRA Conducted by HANS MAY
Harmonic HMP 276 1949
14 Journey Into Melody (Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca F 9101 1949
15 The Falcons (Charles Williams, real name Isaac Cozerbreit)
CHARLES WILLIAMS AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Columbia DB 2992 1952
16 Comic Cuts (Sidney Torch)
SIDNEY TORCH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Parlophone R 3406 1951
17 Sensation For Strings (Philip Green)
PHILIP GREEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM MGM 202 1949
18 Longing (Annunzio Paolo Mantovani)
MANTOVANI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LK 4150 1956
19 Bright Lights (Victor Young)
VICTOR YOUNG AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca DL 8350 1956
20 My Love Is In Florence (Guy Luypaerts)
GUY LUYPAERTS AND HIS ORCHESTRA (as ‘GUY LUPAR’on LP label)
Capitol T 10024 1956
21 Autumn Song (Otto Cesana)
OTTO CESANA AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CL 631 1955
22 Humpty Dumpty (Peter Yorke)
PETER YORKE AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Columbia DB 2569 1949
23 Twilight Serenade (Alfredo Antonini)
ALFREDO ANTONINI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Vogue Coral LVA 9031 1956
24 Mississippi (Frank De Vol)
FRANK DE VOL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Capitol H 198 1950
25 Chats De Gouttiere (Alley Cats) (Gérard Calvi, real name Grégoire Elie Krettly)
GÉRARD CALVI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Pye NPL 28003 1958

Stereo: tracks 1-5; rest in mono.

Composers are often envied by those who do not possess the necessary talent to be able to produce a musical work that others will enjoy. But a touch of genius can sometimes generate frustration. Few writers are completely satisfied with the way in which their works are performed by orchestras over which they have little or no control, so it is a bonus for both composer and listener when music is conducted by the original creator. Of course there are instances where arrangers and conductors can occasionally reveal hidden beauty that even the composer did not fully appreciate, but that is another story. Guild’s first two collections marrying the talents of composer and conductor (GLCD5177 & 5178) were well received, and it is hoped that this third CD will meet with similar approval.

Percy Faith (1908-1976) was born in Toronto, Canada, and an injury to his hands from a fire forced him to rethink his plans for a career as a concert pianist. He turned to arranging, composing and conducting and in 1940 he moved permanently to the USA where he quickly established himself through radio and recordings. From the 1950s onwards his fame spread internationally, due to the great success of his numerous long playing albums. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Faith arranged all his own material, and his exciting and vibrant scores made his work stand out among the rest.

Rudolf Friml (1879-1972) was a talented and prolific composer, born in Prague (then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire) where he studied piano and composition with Antonín Dvořák at the Conservatory. As a young man he moved to the United States where he found success as a composer of operettas, notably “Rose-Marie" and "The Vagabond King". These were just two of around 20 Broadway scores and two original screen musicals. The Miller International organisation (which embraced several new labels to promote early stereo in the States) engaged 79-year-old Friml to front their newly-titled ‘101 Strings’ in a collection of his own melodies, from which comes Someday.

Leroy Anderson(1908-1975) is probably the best-loved American light music composer of his generation. For many years he was the chief arranger for the Boston Pops, and its famous conductor, Arthur Fiedler, introduced many Anderson novelties to an appreciative world. He was so prolific that some of his numbers have tended to become overlooked, such as Clarinet Candy.

Hal (born Harold) Mooney (1911-1995) is making another Guild appearance with his composition Aries, which comes from a collection spotlighting each sign of the zodiac. Upon the completion of his music studies in his native New York he was invited to join the arrangers' roster for the popular Hal Kemp Orchestra, alongside John Scott Trotter (who was about to leave the band) and Lou Busch. After war service in the US Army he moved to Hollywood where he worked with many of the top stars such as Bing Crosby, Judy Garland and Frank Sinatra. In 1956 Mooney finally swapped freelancing for an exclusive contract and became A&R Director and chief arranger at Mercury Records, where he remained until Philips phased out the label towards the end of the 1960s. Mooney then moved to Universal Studios, working as MD on many of the top TV shows of the period, before retiring in 1977.

Richard Warren Joseph Hayman (b. 1920) - as well as being a respected arranger and conductor - was also a harmonica virtuoso, and he sometimes adapted his scores of popular melodies so that he could perform on his favourite instrument. This formula brought him two chart successes in the early 1950s, with 78s of Ruby and April In Portugal. He followed Leroy Anderson as an arranger for the Boston ‘Pops’ Orchestra over a period of more than 30 years, and also served as Music Director of Mercury Records. He was regularly in demand to orchestrate Broadway shows and film soundtracks.

David Rose (1910-1990) was one of the biggest names in American light music circles during the middle years of the 20th century. Born in London, England ‘lost’ him when the family moved to the USA when he was aged just four, but he retained a love for his birthplace and in his later years his fascination with steam railways often brought him back across the Atlantic. A prolific composer and arranger, he is an established Guild favourite, and A Frenchman In New York may have been one of his lesser known works, but it has the hallmarks of the master musician stamped all over it.

Ronald (Ron) Alfred Goodwin(1925-2003) was a brilliant British composer, arranger and conductor, whose tuneful music reached the furthest corners of the world. As he gained recognition for his original compositions he became in demand for film scores, and the success of "The Trials Of Oscar Wilde" (1960) undoubtedly enhanced Goodwin’s reputation. This led to major commissions in the following years, like "633 Squadron" (1964), "Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines" (1965) and Alfred Hitchcock’s "Frenzy" (1972).

Meredith Willson (1902-1984) will always be remembered for his hit musical "The Music Man", which was a big success on Broadway and later a Hollywood film. But he also composed and conducted some attractive pieces of Light Music, some to be found on an early Brunswick 10" LP called "Encore". Several have already appeared on Guild CDs, and Boy Meets Girl can now be added to the list.

Roger Roger (1911-1995) was a leading figure on the French music scene for many years, and his fine compositions and arrangements also won him many admirers internationally. He started writing for French films towards the end of the 1930s, and after the Second World War he played piano and conducted a 35-piece orchestra for a major French weekly radio series "Paris Star Time". His own instrumental cameos that were featured in the show brought him to the attention of the London publishers Chappell & Co., who were rapidly expanding their Recorded Music Library of background music at that time. Roger’s quirky compositions soon became available to radio, television and film companies around the world, one of the earliest being The Toy Shop Window (La Vitrine aux Jouets) on Guild GLCD 5119. His works often possessed a childish air, and Happiness Day fits neatly into this category.

Laurie Johnson (b.1927) has been a leading figure on the British entertainment scene for over 50 years. A gifted arranger and composer, Laurie has contributed to films, musical theatre, radio, television and records, with his music used in many well-known productions such as "The Avengers" and "The Professionals".

Eric Coates (1886-1957) is widely regarded as the foremost English composer of light music during the first half of the 20th century. Towards the end of his life he wrote one of his most enduring works, the march from the 1954 film "The Dam Busters" (on GLCD5147 & 5202). He composed many signature tunes, and Sound And Vision was commissioned by Associated TeleVision when commercial television started in Britain in 1955.

Walter ‘Wally’ Stott, born in Leeds, Yorkshire (1924-2009) is today widely recognised as one of the finest arrangers and film composers. When Wally became Angela Morley she left England for the USA where she worked on several big budget movies (one example is the "Star Wars" series assisting John Williams), and on TV shows such as "Dallas" and "Dynasty". But during the 1950s and 1960s she made numerous recordings under her former name, also contributing many light music cameos to the Chappell Recorded Music Library.

Hans May (real name Johannes Mayer, 1891-1959) was a Viennese-born composer and music director who devoted much of his musical life to composing for the screen and stage. Initially he worked in the German film industry, but in the mid-1930s the developing political situation forced him to relocate briefly in France before eventually settling in England, like so many other mid-European musicians at that time. His numerous films included scores for the Boulting Brothers, Gainsborough Films and the Rank Organisation, and he conducted many early 78s for the Harmonic Music Library which was established in the mid-1940s. Here They Are finds him as both composer and conductor, and previously he has been included on Guild CDs with Rippling Down The Mountain (GLCD5112) and Nine Naughty Gnomes (GLCD5144).

Canadian-born Robert Joseph Farnon (1917-2005) is widely regarded as one of the greatest light music composers and arrangers of his generation. His melodies such as Portrait Of A Flirt (on Guild GLCD 5120) and Jumping Bean (GLCD5162) are familiar to millions around the world.

Londoner Charles Williams (born Isaac Cozerbreit, 1893-1978) composed a vast amount of music for films and production music libraries. He is one of the top contributors to Guild CDs.

Sidney Torch, MBE (born in London, Sidney Torchinsky 1908-1990) is well-known in Britain for his numerous Parlophone recordings, as well as his long tenure as conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in the "Friday Night Is Music Night" BBC radio programme. He wrote some excellent light music cameos for the Chappell Recorded Music Library, where Comic Cuts first appeared.

Philip Green (born Harry Philip Green in Whitechapel, London 1911-1982) began his professional career at the age of eighteen playing in various orchestras. Within a year he became London’s youngest West End conductor at the Prince of Wales Theatre. His long recording career began with EMI in 1933, and he is credited with at least 150 film scores.

Annunzio Paolo Mantovani (1905-1980) became the conductor of one of the most famous light orchestras in the world from the 1950s onwards. Born in Venice, his family came to England when he was aged four and he was something of a prodigy on the violin by the time he reached sixteen. But he leaned more towards popular music, and fronted many different kinds of ensembles before long-playing records (especially when stereo arrived) brought him universal acclaim. Despite a very busy schedule embracing radio, television, concerts and recordings he also found time to compose and arrange for his magnificent orchestra.

Chicago-born Victor Young (1900-1956) enjoyed a successful career on Broadway and in Hollywood films, although his greatest triumph – the score for the film "Around The World In Eighty Days" – was completed shortly before his death, so he never knew that it gained him a posthumous Oscar.

Guy-Claude Luypaerts (b. 1917) was born in Paris to Belgian parents during the First World War and he became well-known in French musical circles through conducting an orchestra called the Nouvelle Association Symphonique de Paris. Guild has previously included his imaginative sounds in the Cole Porter tribute (GLCD 5127) and conducting quirky cameos such as The Sleepwalker of Amsterdam (GLCD 5131), Masquerade In Madrid (GLCD 5132), Jose Fontaine’s catchy Whimsy, and his own composition Chatter Box (GLCD5160). This time it is the turn of his more romantic My Love Is In Florence.

Italian-born Otto Cesana (1899-1980) spent much of his early career in California where he lived from 1908 to 1930. His piano studies commenced at the age of ten, and he became an accomplished organist; he also learned about orchestration and harmony which he put to good use working in radio and Hollywood film studios. Although his recorded output was not large compared with some of his contemporaries, he usually conducted his own compositions which were of a consistently high standard – as already illustrated on several previous Guild Light Music CDs.

Peter Yorke (1902-1966) is a regular contributor to this series of CDs, as composer, arranger and conductor. After working in British Dance Bands of the 1920s and 1930s, he graduated to arranging for Louis Levy before eventually forming his own concert orchestra for recording and broadcasting.

Alfredo Antonini (1901-1983) was born in Italy and studied at the Milan Conservatory under Toscanini. By the 1930s he had established himself as both a composer and conductor and became well-known to the American public through his radio programmes in the 1940s – notably with the CBS Symphony, the CBS Pan American Orchestra and the Columbia Concert Orchestra. He worked with many leading singers, and frequently appeared at the top concert halls in the Americas. In the 1950s his television shows brought classical music to the masses, and his programmes with stars such as Julie Andrews, Eileen Farrell and Beverly Sills received critical acclaim.

In the USA Frank De Vol (1911-1999) is known primarily as the composer for the radio and TV series "The Brady Bunch", but light music fans appreciate that his career has been far more substantial. It was not uncommon to see the credit ‘Music by De Vol’ on many films, and he had an executive position at Columbia Records, for whom he made a number of successful mood music albums.

Gérard Calvi (real name Grégoire Elie Krettly, born 1922) first came to the attention of the public in his native France when he contributed the music in 1948 to a show called "Les Branquignols". The following year he composed the score for "La Patronne", launching a career in mainly European films that would continue for the rest of the 20th Century. By far his best known cinematic work was for the "Asterix" films, but Calvi was equally at home in the theatre and recording studios, and writing popular songs – over 300 in total.

Sadly the available space in this booklet only permits brief pen portraits of each of the 25 talented composer/conductors featured in this collection. But they have all been previously included on earlier Guild Light Music CDs, where it may have been possible to give fuller details of their achievements.

David Ades

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About Geoff 123
Geoff Leonard was born in Bristol. He spent much of his working career in banking but became an independent record producer in the early nineties, specialising in the works of John Barry and British TV theme compilations.
He also wrote liner notes for many soundtrack albums, including those by John Barry, Roy Budd, Ron Grainer, Maurice Jarre and Johnny Harris. He co-wrote two biographies of John Barry in 1998 and 2008, and is currently working on a biography of singer, actor, producer Adam Faith.
He joined the Internet Movie Data-base (www.imdb.com) as a data-manager in 2001 and looked after biographies, composers and the music-department, amongst other tasks. He retired after nine years loyal service in order to continue writing.