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Light Music CDs. Some highly recommended releases.

Light Music is ignored by most Record Stores and Radio Stations, yet it is enjoyed by millions of people around the world.

You may know it as Easy Listening or Concert Music ... or maybe Middle-of-the Road. Whatever you happen to call it, Light Music offers relaxing enjoyment at any time of the day or night, and we hope that you will return regularly to this page in the Robert Farnon Society website to keep fully informed on the latest releases.

Releases up to December 2013

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5211

Light Music While You Work – Volume 5

1 After The Rain (Francesco Canaro)
HARRY FRYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 361 1946
2 Amoretten Tanz (Joseph Gungl)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS WALTZ ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 270 1945
3 Cockney Capers (Peter Crantock, pseudonym of Clive Richardson and Tony Lowry)
WYNFORD REYNOLDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 408 1946
4 Barcarolle (Jacques Offenbach)
RICHARD CREAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 397 1946
5 Careless Cuckoos (Ernest Bucalossi)
HARRY DAVIDSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 349 1945
6 Cavatina (Joseph Joachim Raff)
RICHARD CREAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 268 1945
7 The Druid’s Prayer Waltz (Gordon Davson)
HAROLD COLLINS AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 80 1943
8 Estudiantina (Emile Waldteufel)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS SCOTTISH VARIETY ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 219 1944
9 Chant Sans Paroles (Pyotr Illyich Tchaikovsky)
RICHARD CREAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 268 1945
10 Dolores Waltz (Emile Waldteufel)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS WALTZ ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 309 1945
11 Narcissus (Ethelbert Woodbridge Nevin arr. Philip Green)
HAROLD COLLINS AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 81 1943
12 Heyken’s Serenade No. 1 (Jonny Heykens)
DAVID JAVA AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 176 1944
13 London Calling March (Eric Coates)
HARRY FRYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 361 1946
14 The Frolicsome Hare (Herbert Ashworth-Hope)
WYNFORD REYNOLDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 408 1946
15 Melody In F (Anton Rubinstein)
RICHARD CREAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 397 1946
16 Mon Bijou (My Jewel) (Charles E. Le Paige)
HARRY DAVIDSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 398 1945
17 Parade Of The Tin Soldiers (Leon Jessel)
RICHARD CREAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 96 1943
18 Promotions - Waltz (Johann Strauss II)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS WALTZ ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 320 1945
19 Poeme (Zdenĕk Fibich)
RICHARD CREAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 353 1945
20 Pomone - Waltz (Emile Waldteufel)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS WALTZ ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 270 1945
21 Santiago (A. Corbin arr. Aubrey Winter)
HARRY DAVIDSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 327 1945
22 Unrequited Love (Paul Lincke)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS WALTZ ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 358 1946
23 The Jolly Airmen - March (P. Beechfield-Carver)
HARRY FRYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 340 1945
24 The Mascot Waltz (Edmond Audran)
HARRY DAVIDSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Not Issued Matrix No. DR 8211-2 1944
25 Naila - Rhythmic Paraphrase (Léo Delibes arr. Arthur Lange)
HARRY FRYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 69 1943
26 The Grenadiers - Waltz (Emile Waldteufel)
RONNIE MUNRO AND HIS WALTZ ORCHESTRA
Decca Music While You Work MW 309 1945

All tracks mono

The fact that this collection of music is labelled ‘Volume 5’ should convey at least two significant hints: firstly there have been four previous Guild CDs of similar music; and secondly comments from previous purchasers have indicated that they would still like more from the same source. Fortunately the well has not yet run dry, and it is hoped that the performances by the orchestras who have by now become familiar friends will confirm the high standards that were regularly achieved.

Whereas the title of this collection will mean a lot to British people ‘of a certain age’, it is appropriate to offer an explanation to the younger generation, and Guild Music’s many friends in countries outside the United Kingdom, who may not possess any of the first four volumes. When the full misery of the Second World War was becoming all too apparent in the early months of 1940, the BBC (the sole broadcaster at the time) was persuaded that the public needed cheering up, and morale-boosting radio programmes would be an important addition to other forms of popular entertainment such as the cinema and variety theatres. Radio shows were being relayed to factories to relieve the monotony of mass production, especially in the fields of armaments and other essential war supplies, and it was believed that bright and cheerful music might even increase output.

The result was that a programme called "Music While You Work" was first broadcast on Sunday 23 June 1940 and it soon became something of an institution in British broadcasting, where it was to remain in the schedules for an unbroken run of 27 years.

The man credited with the original idea – and its successful implementation – was Wynford Reynolds. ‘Live’ musicians were usually engaged for the programme, ranging from solo performers such as organists, to small groups, dance bands, light orchestras and military bands. When radio programmes suitable for relaying in factories were not being broadcast, gramophone records were an ideal substitute, relayed over the ubiquitous Tannoy public address system.

Someone at Decca realised that a special series of 78s would fit the bill admirably and their own "Music While You Work" label was born: sensibly they sought Wynford Reynolds’ advice from the outset. These were not intended to be an accurate carbon copy of the BBC broadcasts, and the orchestras on the Decca records (mostly their contract artists) did not necessarily also perform on the radio. But they did succeed in conveying the ‘feel’ of the programme and have provided a fascinating subject for collectors to study over the years.

The first 78s appeared in 1942, and over 400 were eventually released before the final ones were issued in January 1947. Most of the recordings featured dance bands and small groups but many were orchestral and the majority of these may now be found within these five Guild collections.

The series was quickly deleted, and throughout the existence of the label Decca publicity had been sketchy, to say the least. The record buying public was often unaware of what was available, so consequently some of the titles must be quite rare.

Some of the later 78s were recorded using Decca’s revolutionary ‘ffrr’ process which remained a closely guarded secret for some while. It had originally been developed to assist the war effort, and the improved sound quality of several of the later tracks on this CD is evidence of this. With the possible exception of David Java, the orchestras in this collection would have been familiar to radio listeners at the time. Like so many musicians of his era, Harry Fryer (1896-1946) found work playing for silent films and gradually progressed to conducting at London theatres and leading venues in and around the capital. He was a regular broadcaster, both before the war and later frequently on radio in "Music While You Work". The London publishers Boosey & Hawkes contracted Fryer in 1941 to conduct for their Recorded Music Library. By the end of the war he had become a household name and there seems little doubt that, had it not been for his death in 1946 aged only 50, his talents would have been much in demand during the post-war years.

Ronald ‘Ronnie’ George Munro (1897-1989) started his career playing piano in various clubs and bands in London before eventually working regularly with EMI – particularly the HMV ‘house’ orchestra The New Mayfair Orchestra. He contributed numerous arrangements for top recording bands such as Jack Hylton, Lew Stone, Percival Mackey, Ambrose and Henry Hall. In 1940 he was appointed conductor of the BBC’s newly-formed Scottish Variety Orchestra, and Estudiantina is typical of the kind of music for which they became known. After a further spell with a dance band after the war, he formed his light orchestra for radio in the fifties, concluding his BBC career with a sextet which he led between 1962 and 1967. When radio broadcasts dried up, he relocated to South Africa, where he reformed his orchestra, subsequently becoming Head of Light Music for the South African Broadcasting Corporation.

Considering his musical background, it is likely that Wynford Hubert Reynolds (1899-1958) had little problem in persuading the BBC that he had the necessary knowledge to launch "Music While You Work". He was already on the staff of the BBC as a producer, although he was also an experienced performer. He was born in Ebbw Vale, Wales, and his early musical training at the Royal Academy of Music concentrated on the violin, viola and composition. Like many of his fellow musicians, he provided music for silent films, and eventually joined the Queen’s Hall Orchestra under its illustrious conductor (and founder of London’s Promenade Concerts) Sir Henry Wood. Reynolds became involved with the early days of radio in the 1920s, and it wasn’t long before he formed his own orchestra for concerts and broadcasts, including engagements at seaside venues. In 1941 the BBC gave him the important-sounding title ‘Music While You Work Organiser’ but, due to the strict rules imposed by the Corporation on its own employees, this prevented him from appearing with his orchestra in the programmes. He left this position in 1944, and went back to performing on radio, not only in "Music While You Work" but also, later, in popular shows such as "Bright and Early" and "Morning Music".

Richard Crean (1879-1955) became a familiar name in the 1930s through his association with the London Palladium Orchestra, which was probably the best known British theatre orchestra. In recording terms it was also the most prolific, with almost 150 recordings made between 1927 and the early 1940s, many of them conducted by Richard Crean who was in charge from 1930 to 1937. Before joining the London Palladium Orchestra he had travelled widely as Chorus Master with the Thomas Quinlan Opera Company, before accepting a similar position at Covent Garden with Adrian Boult. Then a spell at Ilford Hippodrome in variety led to his appointment in 1930 at the Palladium, which lasted until he formed his own orchestra which he conducted, on and off, for the rest of his life. For a short while in 1941-42 he conducted the newly-formed BBC Midland Light Orchestra, and like Harry Fryer he was also a contributor to the Boosey & Hawkes Recorded Music Library.

Harry Davidson (1892-1967) enjoyed two successful, and different, careers before and following the Second World War. After various engagements around London and the north-east of England spanning the years 1914 to 1929, he finally secured the highly prestigious appointment as organist at the newly built Commodore Theatre at Hammersmith in London. The Commodore had a fine 18-piece orchestra conducted by Joseph Muscant (1899-1983) and, by the early 1930s it had acquired a loyal national following for its regular broadcasts. After five years Muscant left to take over the Troxy Broadcasting Orchestra and, in July 1934, Harry Davidson stepped into his shoes. Although the orchestra was disbanded during the war, Davidson managed to keep many of his superb musicians together and soon he was broadcasting regularly, notching up no less than 109 editions of "Music While You Work" between 1940 and 1946. In November 1943 his series "Those Were The Days" appeared for the first time, providing listeners at home with a regular helping of melodious old-time dance music. It became a permanent fixture in the schedules with Harry in charge until ill-health forced him to retire in November 1965.

Harold Collins (c.1900 - c.1971) was arold Collins, David Java

at one time MD at the London Coliseum, although he also held positions at various provincial theatres. Originally a pianist, it seems he gave his first broadcast from Plymouth in 1936 where he was resident conductor at the Palace Theatre, and was hired by the BBC for "Music While You Work" soon after its launch. In total he appeared in 227 programmes with his Orchestra, and he also made a good number of records for Decca’s MWYW series, usually with a smaller ensemble in a style that suited the light repertoire that was his speciality – his two tracks in this collection are ideal examples. In later years he was heard in BBC shows "Morning Music" and "Melody On The Move", and through his work with Norman Wisdom he appeared on ITV’s top Sunday evening shows from the London Palladium and the Prince of Wales Theatre.

David Java only made two records for Decca’s MWYW series, and his career is poorly documented. In 1938 he played violin alongside Sidney Sax on several Victor Silvester recordings for Parlophone, and again on some Columbia recordings in 1941 when Oscar Grasso, Alfredo Campoli, Reginald Kilbey and Eugene Pini were among the distinguished violin players whom Silvester employed. After the war David Java supplied orchestras for Lyons’ Corner House restaurant and presumably other similar venues.

Now that we’ve met the orchestras, it’s appropriate to mention some of the music. Among what might be described as the ‘traditional’ works by the likes of Gungl, Offenbach, Waldteufel and Tchaikovsky, there are some light music ‘gems’ waiting to delight us.

First in the spotlight is ‘Peter Crantock’ who hid the true identities of Clive Richardson (1909-1998) and Tony Lowry (1888-1976), for several years the piano duettists ‘Four Hands In Harmony’ in the variety halls and on radio. Richardson in particular was a major light music composer, with titles such as London Fantasia (on GLCD5120), Melody On The Move (GLCD5102), Running Off The Rails (GLCD5156) and Holiday Spirit (GLCD5120). Lowry is remembered for Seascape (on GLCD5145) and as co-composer with Douglas Brownsmith (1902-1965) of Down The Mall (GLCD5116, 5147 & 5171) under the pseudonym ‘John Belton’.

Ernest Bucalossi (1859-1933) provided the last century with a truly memorable piece of light music, The Grasshoppers’ Dance (on Guild GLCD5108 & 5122). On this CD he appears with Careless Cuckoos. Ernest followed in the footsteps of his father, Procida (1832-1918), conducting in various establishments (including leading West End theatres) as well as composing.

Jonny Heykens (1884-1945) was a Dutch composer whose music was particularly enjoyed in Germany. His most popular work became known as Heyken’s Serenade (Ständchen) and it has previously featured in three Guild collections – more traditional versions by Marek Weber (GLCD5120) and Mantovani (GLCD5184), although one should not forget Ron Goodwin’s exciting arrangement early on in his career (GLCD5101). Guild included David Java’s version of Heyken’s Serenade No. 2 in the fourth volume in this series, and by popular request we now feature his recording of the more famous first Serenade.

Herbert Ashworth-Hope (usually called Ashworth Hope 1880-1962) was a successful solicitor as well as a composer – his best-known work being Barnacle Bill which was used as the signature tune for BBC TV’s "Blue Peter" children’s programme. Frolicsome Hare was also well received: Lionel Jeffries’ version is on Guild GLCD5143.

There is space left in these notes for two more composers, both born in Germany, confirming that light music was certainly appreciated in many countries in the last century. Leon Jessel (1871-1942) had a big hit with his Parade of the Tin Soldiers in 1911 (also on Guild GLCD5134, and sometimes called Parade Of The Wooden Soldiers – GLCD5114), and in the same year he achieved equal success with The Wedding of the Rose - four outstanding versions have already appeared on Guild: Jack Hylton (GLCD5106); Ron Goodwin (5120); Commodore Grand Orchestra (5168); and Harold Collins in the third volume of this series (5186).

The other German composer Carl Emil Paul Lincke (born in Berlin 1866-1946) worked as a theatre conductor and music publisher in Berlin around the turn of the century. He spent two years in Paris as musical director of the famous Folies-Bergère, but then returned to Berlin, where he conducted at the Apollo Theatre. A versatile musician, he started with the violin, changed to the bassoon and then finally to the piano. He became known around the world for his Glow Worm (on Guild GLCD5106 & 5143), but this was just one number in a large body of musical works. He was generally considered to be ‘the father of Berlin operetta’, putting him (in German speaking countries, at least) on a par with Johann Strauss and Franz Lehar. He is reported to have composed Unrequited Love (Verschmähte Liebe) after his second wife and child left him.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5212

Bright Lights

1 Bright Lights (Frank Sterling, real names Dennis Alfred Berry; Stuart Crombie)
BRUSSELS NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by F.G. TERBY
Southern MQ535 1962
2 Beachcomber (Clive Richardson)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by JACK LEON
Boosey & Hawkes O 2181 1949
3 Hurly-Burly (Len Stevens)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Chappell C 330 1948
4 Trysting Place (Cecil Milner)
THE HARMONIC ORCHESTRA Conducted by HANS MAY
Harmonic HMP 266 1948
5 Tempo For Strings (Bruce Campbell)
STUTTGART RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by KURT REHFELD (‘Lansdowne Light Orchestra’ on disc label)
Impress IA 133 1956
6 Main Event (Michael Sarsfield, real name Hubert Clifford)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
(‘Melodi Light Orchestra Conducted by Ole Jensen’ on disc label)
Chappell C 441 1954
7 Pastorale (Ronald Hanmer)
NEW CENTURY ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 023 1947
8 Twentieth Century Express (Making Tracks) (Trevor Duncan, real name Leonard Charles Trebilco)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by FREDERIC CURZON
Boosey & Hawkes O 2218 1953
9 Sagebrush (Dolf van der Linden)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Paxton PR 589 1954
10 Champs Elysees (Philip Green)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Chappell C 319 1947
11 Hydro Project (Charles Williams)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 630 1959
12 Holiday Camp March (Jack Beaver)
NEW CENTURY ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 024 1947
13 My Waltz For You (Sidney Torch)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Chappell C 291 1947
14 Pictures In The Fire (Robert Farnon)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 335 1948
15 Practice Makes Perfect (Walter Stott)
TELECAST ORCHESTRA Conducted by WALTER STOTT
Chappell C 656 1959
16 Prelude To A Play (Frederic Curzon)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CEDRIC DUMONT
Boosey & Hawkes OT 2336 1958
17 Rhythm Of The Clock (Peter Kane, real names Cedric King Palmer; Richard Mullan)
LONDON PROMENADE ORCHESTRA Conducted by WALTER COLLINS
Paxton PR 432 1947
18 Procession (Vivian Ellis)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by HUBERT CLIFFORD (‘Melodi Light Orchestra’ on disc label)
Chappell C 429 1953
19 Panoramic Prelude (Ernest Tomlinson)
CRAWFORD LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Josef Weinberger JW 104 1957
20 Paper Chase (Cyril Watters)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CHARLES WILLIAMS
Chappell C 704 1961
21 Mayfair Parade (Jack Strachey)
NATIONAL LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BC 1206 1948
22 Silks And Satins (Peter Yorke)
L’ORCHESTRA DEVEREAUX Conducted by GEORGES DEVEREAUX
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 073 1952
23 Marche Heroique (Walter Collins)
LONDON PROMENADE ORCHESTRA Conducted by WALTER COLLINS
Paxton PR 426 1947
24 Race Day (Roger Roger)
ROGER ROGER AND HIS CHAMPS ELYSEES ORCHESTRA
Chappell C 672 1960
25 Bold Horizons (Laurie Johnson)
GROUP-FIFTY ORCHESTRA Conducted by LAURIE JOHNSON
KPM 095 1962

All tracks mono.

This collection pays tribute to the many talented light music composers who contributed to the production music libraries operated by various London publishers to satisfy the requirements of professional users in the media. Although the first stirrings of this branch of the music industry can be traced back to silent film days in the early years of the 20th century, it is generally accepted that the activities of two publishers in the mid-1930s - Bosworth and Boosey & Hawkes - laid the foundations which others would follow. By the 1960s there was a vast reservoir of light music widely available which provided the soundtrack of the era for newsreels, documentary films, radio and television - in fact for any purpose where music added something extra.

The general public was unaware of the existence of this often secretive area of music publishing. Only when a particular melody became familiar through regular use as a signature tune did it begin to dawn upon some avid collectors that they might be missing something. Occasionally a popular theme would be recorded for commercial release by one of the top light orchestras of the day, but the vast catalogue of tuneful orchestral music simply remained undisturbed, with composers hoping that someone, someday, would decide to use their work.

A few of the composers who contributed to these libraries would have been known to music lovers at the time - one immediately thinks of Robert Farnon, Sidney Torch and Charles Williams. But many others were shadowy figures, well regarded by their peers, but whose names were largely unfamiliar. This collection features some of the best writers, although it must be acknowledged that many of their works have already appeared in the previous 111 CDs in this Guild Light Music series. But the fact that it is still possible to assemble such an enjoyable collection of their music illustrates the very high standards that they consistently achieved.

The title track features the work of one of the most prolific - yet still relatively unknown - figures in the mood music world from the 1940s onwards, Dennis Alfred Berry (1921-1994), who also composed (sometimes in collaboration with others) under names such as Peter Dennis, Frank Sterling, Charles Kenbury and Michael Rodney. He was born in London and in 1939 was employed by Francis, Day & Hunter as a copyist before moving on to Boosey & Hawkes as a staff arranger. Then he was taken on by publishers Lawrence Wright followed by Paxton Music as their representative based in Amsterdam. Paxton had a thriving mood music library, but a ban by the Musicians’ Union at the end of the 1940s meant that London publishers could no longer record in Britain. Paxton decided that their mood music 78s should be recorded in the Netherlands by Dolf van der Linden and his Metropole Orchestra, and Berry’s local experience proved very useful in setting this up. He returned to the London office in 1949 and was responsible for producing numerous titles issued by Paxton during the 1950s. This did not prevent him from writing for other libraries such as De Wolfe, Charles Brull, Conroy and Synchro. At the end of the 1950s Dennis Berry was head-hunted to start the Southern Library of Recorded Music (now owned by Universal) which issued its first recordings on 78s in 1960, from which comes our opening track Bright Lights which Den Berry co-composed with Stuart Crombie (d. 1994). Eventually he emigrated to South Africa, before finally returning to England to do freelance work including some film commissions in Germany. A dozen of Den Berry’s compositions have already appeared on Guild: his best-known piece is Holiday In Hollywood on GLCD5119.

Clive Richardson (1909-1998) was part of the piano duo ‘Four Hands in Harmony’ with Tony Lowry (1888-1976), but that was just a small interlude in a long and successful career. He was an early contributor of scores to British films, especially some of the Will Hay comedies, although he wasn’t credited on-screen. London Fantasia (on GLCD5120) was a big success in the 1940s, when mini-piano concertos were all the rage. Other Richardson compositions to succeed were Melody On The Move (GLCD5102), Running Off The Rails (GLCD5156) and Holiday Spirit (GLCD5120), that exuberant theme for BBC Children’s Television Newsreel. Beachcomber has also become a light music ‘classic’.

Len Stevens(d. 1989) (his full name was Herbert Leonard Stevens) was a prolific composer, contributing mood music to several different libraries, with a style that his admirers quickly grew to recognise. Like so many of the talented musicians employed in the business, he could turn his hand to any kind of style that was needed, and he was also involved in the musical theatre. Hurly-Burly is typical of the bright and breezy numbers that were always being heard in cinema newsreels of the 1950s, and it joins around 15 of his compositions that have already reached a wider audience through Guild Light Music CDs.

Edward Cecil Milner (1905-1989) was a highly respected composer and arranger in London music circles, particularly during a long association with Mantovani (1905-1980), for whom he supplied around 220 scores. He was also an accomplished composer (he was being recognised while still in his twenties), with his works, such as Trysting Place, willingly accepted by several background music publishers. In the cinema Milner worked on some 50 films, often for Louis Levy (1893-1957), most notably the 1938 classic "The Lady Vanishes".

Bruce Campbell was one of several writers who owed much to his association with Robert Farnon. He was a fellow Canadian, who actually came to Britain some years before Farnon, and played trombone with various British bands during the 1930s. Towards the end of the 1940s Campbell realised that he possessed some skills as a composer, and Farnon encouraged him and provided some valuable guidance. The fruits of this meeting of talents have already been experienced on Guild CDs on ten occasions in titles such as Cloudland (GLCD5145), Windy Corner (GLCD5150) and Skippy (GLCD5125). Tempo For Strings is typical of his smooth, melodic style.

Michael Sarsfield, credited as the composer of Main Event, is a pseudonym for Dr. Hubert Clifford (1904-1959) who composed several mood pieces for Chappell’s Recorded Music Library, and also conducted a few titles. Born in Tasmania, for many years Clifford was musical director for London Films, and he has recently been remembered in more serious vein for his Symphony 1940. He provided the background music for three British Transport Films – "West Country Journey" (1953), "London’s Country" (1954) and "Round The Island" (1956). The last named made such an impression on him that he decided to move to the area it covered – the Isle of Wight off the south coast of England.

Ronald Hanmer (1917-1994) could make a legitimate claim to being the most prolific of all the composers featured on this CD. His career stretched from the 1930s (he was a cinema organist) until the end of his life, and over 700 of his compositions were published in various background music libraries (examples already on Guild include Proud and Free GLCD 5136, The Four Horsemen and Intermission – both onGLCD 5140). Among his film scores were Made in Heaven (1952), Penny Princess (1952) and Top of the Form (1953). He was also in demand as an orchestrator of well-known works for Amateur Societies, and the brass band world was very familiar with his scores – sometimes used as test pieces. In 1975 he emigrated to Australia, where he was delighted to discover that his melody Pastorale was famous throughout the land as the theme for the long-running radio serial Blue Hills. In 1992 he received the Order of Australia for services to music, just before that country abolished the honours system.

Regular collectors of this Guild series of CDs will already be familiar with the music of Trevor Duncan (real name Leonard Charles Trebilco, 1924-2005). No less than 35 of his original compositions have now been reissued, and among the best-known are his first success High Heels (on Guild GLCD 5124), Grand Vista (GLCD 5124) and Panoramic Splendour (GLCD5111). He had the ability to write in many different styles, which no doubt endeared him to the publishers of mood music who needed to have music readily available to cover any kind of situation. He is represented on this CD by a piece originally called Making Tracks; when it became popular Boosey & Hawkes decided that it needed a different name, and so it was changed to Twentieth Century Express.

Dolf van der Linden (real name David Gysbert van der Linden, 1915-1999) was the leading figure on the light music scene in the Netherlands from the 1940s until the 1980s. As well as broadcasting frequently with his Metropole Orchestra, he made numerous recordings for the background music libraries of major music publishers. He also made transcription recordings for Dutch radio and other companies. His commercial recordings (especially for the American market) were often labelled as ‘Van Lynn’ or ‘Daniel De Carlo’. Sagebrush for Paxton is an example of his close working relationship with the aforementioned Dennis Berry.

Philip Green (born Harry Philip Green 1911-1982) began his professional career at the age of eighteen playing in various orchestras. Within a year he became London’s youngest West End conductor at the Prince of Wales Theatre. His long recording career began with EMI in 1933, and he is credited with at least 150 film scores, including "The League Of Gentlemen" (on Guild GLCD5178). Before he became the major contributor to the Photoplay library his music was accepted by various publishers, including Champs Elysees for Chappells.

Volumes could be written about Londoner Charles Williams (born Isaac Cozerbreit 1893-1978) who began his career accompanying silent films, then played violin under the batons of Beecham and Elgar. Right from the start of the ‘talkies’, he provided scores for numerous British movies, and his Dream Of Olwen (GLCD5192)is still remembered long after the film in which it appeared – "While I Live". By far the greatest volume of his composing skills was employed in mood music, providing hundreds of works for several libraries (especially Chappells), and over 40 have already been included on Guild CDs. His stature as a major composer and conductor of Britain’s Light Music scene is beyond question, and Hydro Project reveals his ability to write dramatic themes which still maintain a melodic edge.

Jack Beaver (1900-1963) was born in Clapham, London, and in the 1930s and 1940s he was part of Louis Levy’s ‘team’ of composers, providing scores for countless feature films and documentaries, including Alfred Hitchcock's first huge international hit "The Thirty-Nine Steps" (for which Beaver received no credit). He was hired by Warner Bros. to run the music department at their British studio at Teddington in the early 1940s and was also much in demand for scoring theatrical productions. He frequently undertook a punishing workload, including numerous pieces for London production music libraries, which eventually contributed towards his early death. His ability to create music to cover almost any mood was second to none, and his Holiday Camp March recalls the 1940s when British holidaymakers had yet to discover the delights of foreign package holidays.

Sidney Torch, MBE (born in London, Sidney Torchinsky 1908-1990) is well-known in Britain for his numerous Parlophone recordings, as well as his long tenure as conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in the "Friday Night Is Music Night" BBC radio programme. He wrote some excellent light music cameos for the Chappell Recorded Music Library, and he conducted the Queen’s Hall Light Orchestra for many of them, such as his charming My Waltz For You.

Canadian-born Robert Joseph Farnon (1917-2005) is widely regarded as one of the greatest light music composers and arrangers of his generation. His melodies such as Portrait Of A Flirt (on Guild GLCD 5120) and Jumping Bean (GLCD5162) are familiar to millions around the world. His Pictures In The Fire reveals his ability to create a tender, pensive melody - something that would become more evident in his later work.

Walter ‘Wally’ Stott, born in Leeds, Yorkshire (1924-2009) is today regarded as one of the finest arrangers and film composers. When Wally became Angela Morley in 1972 she left England for the USA where she worked on several big budget movies (one example is the "Star Wars" series assisting John Williams), and on TV shows such as "Dallas" and "Dynasty". But during the 1950s and 1960s she made numerous recordings under her former name, also contributing many light music cameos to the Chappell Recorded Music Library. Practice Makes Perfect is typical of the many bright, free flowing numbers that she produced at this time.

Londoner Frederic Curzon (1899-1973) devoted his early career to working in the theatre and like so many of his contemporaries he gradually became involved in providing music for silent films. As well as being a fine pianist and a conductor, he also played the organ, and his first big success as a composer was his "Robin Hood Suite" in 1937. This encouraged him to devote more of his time to writing and broadcasting, and several of his works have become light music ‘standards’, notably The Boulevardier (on GLCD5177), Dance of an Ostracised Imp (GLCD5195) and the miniature overture Punchinello (GLCD5203). He was eventually appointed Head of Light Music at London publishers Boosey and Hawkes, and for a while was also President of the Light Music Society. He wrote a large amount of mood music himself, such as Prelude To A Play.

Cedric King Palmer (1913-1999) was a prolific composer of mood music who contributed over 600 works.during a period of 30 years to the recorded music libraries of several London publishers. To survive in the music business meant accepting many varied commissions, and King Palmer could also turn his hand to making popular arrangements of the classics which he often conducted with his own orchestra on the BBC Light programme in the 1940s and 1950s. His many bright and tuneful pieces disguised the fact that he possessed a serious knowledge of music; at the age of 26 he completed a study of the work of Granville Bantock (1868-1946), and in 1944 Palmer wrote ‘Teach Yourself Music’ for the Hodder and Stoughton Home University Series which ran to several editions. He ceased composing mood music in the 1970s, and towards the end of his life he became a patient and popular piano teacher, with sometimes over 60 pupils on his books. Occasionally he collaborated with other composers (probably at the request of his publishers) and with Richard Mullan using the pseudonym Peter Kane he wrote Rhythm Of The Clock.

Vivian Ellis (1903-1996) was only 24 when he had his first big success in London’s West End with his show ‘Mr. Cinders’, and he devoted the major part of his illustrious career to the musical stage. However he also wrote several pieces of light music which have become ‘classics’ in their own right, the most famous being Coronation Scot (on GLCD5120 & 5181) which was initially well-known in Britain through its use as one of the signature tunes for BBC Radio’s "Paul Temple" series in the 1940s. Another familiar piece was Alpine Pastures (GLCD5169) used by the BBC to introduce "My Word". Like some of his contemporaries, Vivian Ellis possessed the precious skill of being able to conjure up a strong melody, although he preferred to leave it to others to orchestrate his creations. It is known that Cecil Milner (1905-1989) was responsible for the famous train sounds in Coronation Scot, and it would have been nice to be able to praise the arranger for Ellis’s Procession, but the record label gives no clues.

Ernest Tomlinson MBE (b.1924) is one of Britain’s most talented composers, working mainly in light music, but also highly regarded for his choral works and brass band pieces. During a very productive career, he has contributed numerous titles to the recorded music libraries of many different publishers, often under the pseudonym ‘Alan Perry’. One of his best-known numbers is Little Serenade, which he developed from a theme he wrote as incidental music for a radio production ‘The Story of Cinderella’ in 1955. His suites of English Folk Dances have also become part of the standard light music repertoire. In recent years Ernest has worked hard to preserve thousands of music manuscripts that would otherwise have been destroyed, and he is the President of the Light Music Society. Panoramic Prelude is one of his numerous pieces of production music.

Cyril Watters (1907-1984) was highly respected by many music publishers, and from 1953 to 1961 he was chief arranger with Boosey & Hawkes, often providing appealing arrangements for melodies supplied by other composers who were either too busy, or insufficiently skilled, to orchestrate their own creations. His compositions were accepted by several different publishers, but Boosey & Hawkes had the honour of introducing his most successful composition to the world – the sensuous Willow Waltz (GLCD5189) which created quite a stir in Britain when used as the theme for ‘The World of Tim Frazer’ on BBC Television in 1960. Cyril also worked at Chappells for a while, and Paper Chase was one of the bright, bustling numbers that he seemed able to produce at ease.

Jack Strachey (1894-1972) has ensured his musical immortality by writing These Foolish Things (GLCD5133). In the world of light music he is also remembered as the composer of In Party Mood (GLCD5120), the catchy number he wrote for Bosworths in 1944 which was later chosen for the long-running BBC Radio series "Housewives’ Choice". This is just one of a series of catchy instrumentals that have flowed from his pen, and he seemed particularly gifted at writing marches with a sporting or show business theme. Mayfair Parade is typical of his work in the 1940s.

Peter Yorke (1902-1966) worked with many leading British bands during his formative years, some of the most notable being Percival Mackey, Jack Hylton and Henry Hall. In 1936 he began a fruitful collaboration as chief arranger with Louis Levy, one of the pioneers of music for British films, who employed several talented writers such as Clive Richardson, Charles Williams and Jack Beaver, but seldom gave them any credit on-screen. Later on Peter Yorke conducted one of Britain’s most popular broadcasting orchestras from the 1940s until the 1960s. He was also a gifted composer and he created many stunning arrangements that brought out some fine performances from the top musicians he always employed. Apart from his many commercial records, from the mid-1930s he contributed many works to the recorded music libraries of the top London publishers, and Silks And Satins (which became familiar in Britain when used as the signature tune for the TV soap "Emergency – Ward 10") is his 17th composition to be reissued on a Guild CD.

Walter R. Collins (1892-1956) is remembered for his days as the distinguished Musical Director of the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, and also for conducting the London Promenade Orchestra for the Paxton Recorded Music Library during the 1940s. Several of his own compositions have already appeared on Guild CDs (Laughing Marionette on GLCD5134; Linden Grove GLCD5112; possibly his best loved piece Moontime GLCD5168; Paper Hats And Wooden Swords GLCD5144; and Springtime GLCD5138). Marche Heroique can now be added to this list.

Roger Roger (1911-1995) was a leading figure on the French music scene for many years, and his fine compositions and arrangements also won him many admirers internationally. He started writing for French films towards the end of the 1930s and after the Second World War he played piano and conducted a 35-piece orchestra for a major French weekly radio series "Paris a l’heure des Etoiles", which was sent all over the world and even broadcast in the USA. His own instrumental cameos that were featured in the show brought him to the attention of the London publishers Chappell & Co., who were rapidly expanding their Recorded Music Library of background music at that time. Roger’s quirky compositions soon became available to radio, television and film companies around the world, one of the earliest being The Toy Shop Window (La Vitrine aux Jouets) on Guild GLCD 5119. Race Day is his 24th composition to be featured on a Guild CD.

The final track features a piece by Laurie Johnson (b.1927) who has been a leading figure on the British entertainment scene for 50 years. A gifted arranger and composer, Laurie has contributed to films, musical theatre, radio, television and records, with his music used in many well-known productions such as "The Avengers" and "The Professionals". When KPM launched its mood music library in 1959 Laurie’s compositions were strongly featured. Bold Horizons illustrates the way in which some composers were beginning to steer production music away from the traditional sounds associated more with the 1940s. The 1960s had arrived, and a new breed of writers wanted to express their ideas with modern harmonies and rhythms. Laurie Johnson was at the forefront of this movement, and his exciting creations were in tune with what was happening in the musical world at large.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5209

My Dream Is Yours

1 I’m Falling In Love With Someone (from "Naughty Marietta") (Victor Herbert, arr. Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8007 1958
2 My Dream Is Yours (Ralph Blane; Harry Warren)
JOHN CLEGG AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LPM 1732 1958
3 Dreamtime (The Melba Waltz) (Mischa Spoliansky)
MANTOVANI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca F 10174 1953
4 You Go To My Head (J. Fred Coots, arr. Frank Cordell)
FRANK CORDELL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
HMV CSD 1251 1958
5 Sleepy Time Gal (Angel Lorenzo; Richard Whiting; Joseph Adlan; Raymond Egan, arr. Matty Matlock)
PAUL WESTON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Capitol ST 1223 1959
6 Amber (Jean McKenna)
ARCHIE BLEYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Cadence 1320 1954
7 If I Could Be With You (James P. Johnson; Henry Creamer, arr. Paul Weston)
PAUL WESTON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Capitol ST 1192 1959
8 Stardust (Hoagy Carmichael, arr. Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LK 4055 1953
9 Speak To Me (Louis Gaste)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Van Lynn’ on LP label)
Decca DL 8066 1954
10 She’s My Lovely (Vivian Ellis)
MAX JAFFA AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Music For Pleasure MFP 1017 1962
11 Joan (Walter Scharf)
WALTER SCHARF AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Jubilee JLP 1033 1957
12 Yours (Quiereme Mucho) (Gonzalo Roig)
THE MELACHRINO STRINGS Conducted by GEORGE MELACHRINO
HMV DLP 1127 1956
13 La Femme (Maddy Russell; Jack Seagal)
SIDNEY TORCH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Coral CRL 57007 1953
14 Everything I Have Is Yours (Burton Lane; Harold Adamson, arr. Brian Fahey)
CYRIL ORNADEL AND THE STARLIGHT SYMPHONY
MGM SE 4033 1962
15 Where Or When (Richard Rodgers; Lorenz Hart, arr. Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LK 4086 1955
16 Emberglow (Edward Leonard, real names Len Stevens and Edward Holmes)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON (‘Melodi Light Orchestra conducted by Ole Jensen’ on disc label)
Chappell C 488 1954
17 Somebody Loves Me (George Gershwin, arr. Wally Stott)
WALLY STOTT AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Philips BBR 8004 1954
18 You’ve Done Something To My Heart (Noel Gay, real name Reginald Armitage)
MAX JAFFA AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Music For Pleasure MFP 1017 1962
19 Bright Star (Robert J. Hafner)
CARL COTNER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Challenge 59077 1960
20 Adrift (Murray Newman, arr. Bruce Campbell)
BRUCE CAMPBELL AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Coronet Orchestra’ on disc label)
MGM E 3167 1955
21 Here Am I (Jerome Kern; Oscar Hammerstein II)
PETE KING AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Warner Bros W 1294 1959
22 Now And Forever (Oscar Straus)
ARMAND BERNARD AND HIS STRING ORCHESTRA
Nixa LPY 160 1955
23 Café Pousse (Earle H. Hagen, Herbert Spencer)
THE SPENCER-HAGEN ORCHESTRA
Label "X" LXA 1003 1955
24 Deep In A Dream (Jimmy Van Heusen; Eddie Delange, arr. Reg Owen)
REG OWEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LPM 1907 1960
25 They Say It’s Wonderful (from "Annie Get Your Gun") (Irving Berlin, arr. Peter Yorke)
PETER YORKE AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Decca DL 8240 1954

Stereo: tracks 1, 4, 5, 7 & 14; rest in mono.

This collection could have been called "Music for Dreamy Romantics" because that is probably an accurate description of most, if not all, of the music. There are times when all of us just want to relax and allow pleasant, tuneful and relaxing melodies to soothe away the cares of the day: to use the current parlance – to ‘chill out’. Hopefully the orchestras of light music masters such as Percy Faith, Robert Farnon, David Rose, Mantovani, Paul Weston and George Melachrino will apply their usual magic. But some new names to the ‘Guild family of conductors’ can be spotted this time, and it seems only fair that they should receive a special welcome.

The first newcomer, in order of appearance, is New Yorker Archibald ‘Archie’ Martin Bleyer (1909-1989), who enjoyed a successful career in the US prior to World War II as a young songwriter, arranger and bandleader. From 1946 to 1953 he worked with Arthur Godfrey on his radio and TV shows, and was widely credited with having been an important element in their success. From 1952 to 1964 Bleyer managed his own Cadence label, which enjoyed big hits from the Everly Brothers, The Chordettes, Johnny Tillotson and Andy Williams, as well as several instrumental successes by Bleyer himself, such as Amber. Changing tastes in pop music during the 1960s were not to Archie Bleyer’s liking, and after he sold Cadence to Andy Williams (who formed Barnaby Records to manage the catalogue) he was content to take a back seat in the music business. He retired to his wife’s hometown, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where he died aged 79.

It is surprising that it has taken 109 Guild collections before Max Jaffa appears with his orchestra, although the mellow tones of his violin will have been heard on numerous occasions as a session player with many of the top post-war light orchestras. He was classically trained at London’s Guildhall School of Music where his honours included the Gold Medal and Principal’s Prize. His early career found him playing for silent films and in 1929 he formed his own salon orchestra which enjoyed a five-year residency at the Piccadilly Hotel. During World War II he became a pilot in RAF Bomber Command, and when peace returned he joined the Mantovani Orchestra, eventually becoming its leader. During the 1950s he formed The Max Jaffa Trio, which included cellist Reginald Kilbey and pianist Jack Byfield. They were part of the British music scene for over 30 years. From 1959 to 1986 Jaffa spent each summer at Scarborough, conducting the Yorkshire seaside resort’s famous Spa Orchestra. He was awarded the OBE for services to music in 1982, and retired in 1990, just a year before he died at the age of 79. She’s My Lovely and You’ve Done Something To My Heart are good examples of the tuneful arrangements that reflected his mastery of his instrument, and the way in which he allowed it to interweave with the full orchestra.

Walter Scharf (1910-2003) who conducts his own composition Joan, has only appeared once on a previous Guild CD (playing Victor Young’s Travellin’ Light – GLCD5114) so he almost qualifies as a ‘newcomer’. Born in New York, for most of his professional life he concentrated his career in the film world, having arrived in Hollywood in 1933 (his early commissions were for Al Jolson at 20th Century Fox, and Bing Crosby at Paramount) where he continued to work until the 1980s. Some notable films included "Holiday Inn" (in 1942 he orchestrated the original version of Irving Berlin’s White Christmas), "Hans Christian Anderson" (1952) and Barbra Streisand’s "Funny Girl" in 1968. He also worked on three Elvis Presley movies, and collaborated with lyricist Don Black on songs for Michael Jackson. In later years he was much in demand from US Television, with series including "Ben Casey", "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." and "Mission Impossible".

The American violinist and bandleader Carl Cotner (1916-1986) seems to have spent much of his career in Country and Western music circles. As a ‘country fiddler’ he worked with bandleader Clayton McMichen, then in 1937 joined Gene Autry for his "Melody Ranch" radio shows, and became musical director for some of the singing cowboy’s films. He stayed with Autry when "Melody Ranch" transferred to television, and also worked on early TV series like "The Range Rider" and "Buffalo Bill Jr." – both in 1951. Perhaps Bright Star finds him outside his usual comfort zone?

The other new-to-Guild orchestra this time is that of Parisian Armand Bernard (1895-1965). He was known in his native France during the 1940s and 1950s, and he seems to have made a speciality of waltz music. Although not a prolific recording artist, he made several 78s and some early LPs mainly for the Pacific label, but also for some other companies. Now And Forever was written by the Viennese composer Oscar Straus (1870-1954) whose prolific output included popular operettas such as "The Chocolate Soldier" and "A Waltz Dream". Bernard’s orchestra features an electronic organ in the line-up, something that a number of conductors were tempted to use around that time – probably to produce a fuller, richer sound, without the need to employ too many extra musicians.

Our opening track is provided by Percy Faith (1908-1976) who hardly needs any introduction to Guild ‘regulars’. Born in Toronto, Canada, in 1940 he moved permanently to the USA where he quickly established himself through radio and recordings. From the 1950s onwards his fame spread internationally, due to the great success of his numerous long playing albums. I’m Falling In Love With Someone comes from his tribute to Victor Herbert (1859-1924).

The melody which gives this collection its title, My Dream Is Yours, features in a delightful arrangement played by John Clegg and his Orchestra. This is the third time he has been included on a Guild CD, but frustratingly it has not (yet) been possible to identify him, despite correspondence to musicians with this name (all unanswered) and references to light music experts.

Fortunately no mystery surrounds Annunzio Paolo Mantovani (1905-1980) who became the conductor of one of the most famous light orchestras in the world from the 1950s onwards. He provides his usual polished performance of Dreamtime (also known as The Melba Waltz) composed by Russian-born Mischa Spoliansky (1898-1985) for the British film ‘Melba’ (1953). He left the German film industry during the 1930s to work in Britain, and later the USA.

Frank Cordell (1918-1980) was a talented English composer, arranger and conductor, and it is his latter two talents that produce the sublime version of You Go To My Head chosen for this collection.

Paul Weston (born Paul Wetstein 1912-1996) was one of America’s top arrangers and conductors, whose orchestral collections such as "Music For Dreaming" and "Music For Memories" were to provide the springboard for many future albums. He provides two charming pieces for this CD: Sleepy Time Gal and If I Could Be With You.

Canadian-born Robert Farnon (1917-2005) also offers two superlative arrangements of standards by top American songwriters: Stardust (by Hoagy Carmichael) and Where Or When (Richard Rodgers).

Dolf van der Linden (real name David Gysbert van der Linden, 1915-1999) was the leading figure on the light music scene in the Netherlands from the 1940s until the 1980s. As well as broadcasting frequently with his Metropole Orchestra, he made numerous recordings for the background music libraries of major music publishers. His commercial recordings (especially for the American market) were often labelled as ‘Daniel De Carlo’ or ‘Van Lynn’ - from which comes Speak To Me.

George Miltiades Melachrino (1909-1965) was one of the big names in British light music from the 1940s to the 1960s. He has already appeared on many Guild CDs, and his tasteful arrangements were usually either by himself or his right-hand man, arranger and pianist William Hill-Bowen (1918-1964). Sadly the LP label and sleeve give no clues as to which of them was responsible for Yours.

Sidney Torch, MBE (born Sidney Torchinsky 1908-1990) is well-known in Britain for his numerous Parlophone recordings, as well as his long tenure as conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in the "Friday Night Is Music Night" BBC radio programme. La Femme comes from a very rare LP he recorded in London for the American market, which was never originally released in Britain.

Everything I Have Is Yours brings us the combined talents of conductor Cyril Ornadel (1924-2011) and arranger Brian Fahey (1919-2007). From the late 1950s onwards this team made an acclaimed series of records with the "Starlight Symphony", aimed primarily at the American market.

Emberglow comes from the Chappell Recorded Music Library. The composers were Len Stevens (d. 1989) and Edward Holmes, the manager of the Library affectionately known as ‘Teddy’ to all the musicians who provided such a wealth of top class orchestral music that made Chappells the predominant providers of mood music for many years from the 1940s onwards.

Angela Morley (1924-2009) needs no introduction to Guild ‘regulars’. Somebody Loves Me was arranged while she was still known as ‘Wally Stott’, and the glorious string sound she creates reflects her experience of working with Robert Farnon. In her later career she left England for the USA where she worked on several big budget movies (one example is the "Star Wars" series assisting John Williams), and on TV shows such as "Dallas" and "Dynasty".

Bruce Campbell was one of several writers who also owed much to his association with Robert Farnon. He was a fellow Canadian, who actually came to Britain some years before Farnon, and played trombone with various top British bands during the 1930s. Campbell assisted Farnon on his post-war BBC radio shows, and eventually became a frequent contributor to various mood music libraries. Adrift comes from a rare LP that Campbell recorded anonymously in Britain for the American market.

The American orchestra leader Peter Dudley King (1914-1982) was also a successful songwriter and arranger, whose career embraced radio, television, recordings and films. Here Am I is one of the lesser-known works by Jerome Kern (1885-1945) from the 1929 show "Sweet Adeline".

In 1952 Earle Hagan (1919-2008), famous as the composer of the jazz standard Harlem Nocturne, formed a partnership with fellow arranger Herbert Winfield Spencer (1905-1992). Together, they launched the Spencer-Hagen Orchestra, which recorded albums for RCA and Liberty, and more significantly, they began writing music for television series. They ended their partnership in 1960. Café Pousse which they co-composed comes from an album for which the inspiration was various cocktails.

Reg Owen (born George Owen Smith, 1921-1978) took up the saxophone at fifteen, played in youth bands then completed his education at the Royal College of Music in London. Following RAF service, in which he played for the Bomber Command Band, he became arranger for the Ted Heath orchestra from 1945, moving on to work for other conductors including Cyril Stapleton. When he joined the PRS in 1954 he decided to change his name legally to "Reginald Owen." Regarded as one of England's leading orchestrators, Reg published his book "The Reg Owen Arranging Method" in 1956. He is regarded as a ‘one hit wonder’ thanks to his best-selling recording of Manhattan Spiritual in 1958. His own film scores date from 1957 and include "Murder Reported" (1958), "Very Important Person" (1961), "A Coming-Out Party" (1961) and "Payroll" (1962). He moved to Brussels in 1961, although he continued to arrange, compose and conduct albums all over Europe, including France, Germany and Italy before moving finally to Spain where he died in 1978. His contribution to this collection, Deep In A Dream, is another of those lovely half-forgotten melodies which surely deserves a better fate.

Londoner Peter Yorke (1902-1966) is a regular contributor to this series of CDs, as composer, arranger and conductor. After a grounding in British Dance Bands of the 1920s and 1930s, notably Jay Whidden (1928), Jack Hylton (1929-33) and Henry Hall (1932-33), he graduated to arranging for Louis Levy before eventually forming his own concert orchestra for recording and broadcasting. Irving Berlin wrote "they say that falling in love is wonderful" and it is to be hoped that these lyrics have been reflected throughout all the music on this CD. We may sometimes only dream of finding a true love, but for many fortunate people dreams can and do come true.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5210

Invitation To The Dance

1 Dance Of The Goblins (La Ronde des Lutins) (Antonio Bazzini)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Paxton PR 610 1954
2 Ballet Égyptien - 1st Movement - Allegro Non Troppo (Alexandre Clément Léon Joseph Luigini)
THE EMBASSY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conducted by MICHAEL FREEDMAN
Embassy WEP 1031-S 1959
3 Dance Of The Tarantulas (William Blezard)
NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CEDRIC DUMONT
Boosey & Hawkes O 2204 1951
4 Moonspun Dreams (John C. Egan; Allan Flynn, arr. Ivan Caryll)
HARRY DAVIDSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia DX 1814 1952
5 Mexican Hat Dance (F.A. Partichela, arr. Ronald Hanmer)
MICHAEL FREEDMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Jacques Leroy’ on disc label)
Embassy WLP 60002 1960
6 Pirouette (Montague Phillips)
TELECAST ORCHESTRA Conducted by ELLIOTT MAYES
Chappell C 591 1957
7 Apache Dance (Jacques Offenbach)
HARRY FRYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LF1059 1951
8 Banner Of Youth - March (Sidney Torch)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Chappell C 724 1961
9 Piccolo Polka (Meredith Willson)
MEREDITH WILLSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA Solo piccolo: PAUL RENZI
Brunswick LA 8628 1953
10 Cresta Blanca Waltz (Morton Gould)
MORTON GOULD AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LM-2006-C 1956
11 The Dancing Cane (David Rose)
DAVID ROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM 794 1954
12 Ascot Gavotte (from "My Fair Lady") (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe – arr. Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CL 695 1956
13 Calypso In D (Yellow Bird) (Trad, arr. Helmut Zacharias)
HELMUT ZACHARIAS AND HIS MAGIC VIOLINS
Polydor 45151 1958
14 Feliciana (Frank Perkins)
FRANK PERKINS AND HIS ‘POPS’ ORCHESTRA
Brunswick LA 8708 1955
15 Song Of Tonfano (Anthony Mawer)
HILVERSUM RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by HUGO DE GROOT
De Wolfe DW 2706 1961
16 Vive Le Sport – March (Roger Roger)
ROGER ROGER AND HIS CHAMPS ELYSEES ORCHESTRA
Chappell C 574 1957
17 Evening Bells (Carste; Ralph Maria Siegel)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Van Lynn’ on disc label)
Brunswick LAT 8074 1955
18 Fifth Avenue Waltz (Robert Mersey)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by MALCOLM LOCKYER
Chappell C 635 1959
19 Dance Ballerina Dance (Carl Sigman; Sidney Keith Russell)
WERNER MÜLLER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca SLK 16 234P 1962
20 Golden Slippers (Trad. arr. Rickey Marino; Felix Slatkin)
FELIX SLATKIN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Liberty LSS 14024 1962
21 Interval Waltz (Vivian Ellis)
THE NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Boosey & Hawkes O 2408 1962
22 Rhumba For Romeos (Trevor Duncan, real name Leonard Trebilco)
THE NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by MONIA LITER (‘Paul Hamilton’ on disc label)
Boosey & Hawkes O 2378 1960
23 Pretty Polka (Geoffrey Henman)
THE NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by MONIA LITER (‘Paul Hamilton’ on disc label)
Boosey & Hawkes O 2402 1961
24 Venus Waltz (Ron Goodwin)
HANS GEORG ARLT AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Ariola 32721 1958
25 Millionaire’s Hoe-Down (Wayne Robinson; Caesar Giovannini; Herman Clebanoff)
CLEBANOFF AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury PPS 6019 1961
26 Invitation To The Dance (Carl Maria von Weber)
MANTOVANI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LK 4161 1956

Stereo: tracks 2, 19-25; rest in mono.

Eric Coates, the famous English composer of Light Music, once observed: "my marches aren’t intended for marching and my waltzes aren’t meant for waltzing". This oft repeated quote is not an entirely accurate description of everything he composed, but it does indicate that marches and waltzes (especially the latter) have provided inspiration for many composers who simply decided that they should be listened to rather than danced. This applies to a good number of the titles on this CD, although there are also many where the intention is definitely in favour of active participation, rather than purely passive listening. It will also be noted that a few numbers are not strictly dances, but somewhere in their titles the word ‘dance’ or ‘dancing’ appears, clearly suggesting what the composer had in mind.

Our first three pieces of music fall into the latter category. The exciting Dance Of The Goblins by the Italian Antonio Bazzini (1818-1897) was originally called "Scherzo Fantastique for Violin and Piano" and it must have demanded considerable aptitude from both musicians. Probably the full orchestra makes it even more exhilarating.

Ballet Égyptien composed in 1875 by Frenchman Luigini (1850-1906) was a true gift to comedians during the earlier years of the last century: would the sand dancers Wilson, Keppel and Betty have been so popular without it? The version in this collection is a rare stereo recording conducted by Michael Freedman (1911-1979) who, as a young man, studied the violin and at the age of 16 was offered his first engagements in West End theatre orchestras. Thereafter he tended to concentrate more on the art of conducting, and at various times worked with Toscanini, Furtwängler, von Karajan and Cantelli. However, like all musicians needing to pay the bills he used his talents widely, and in the early 1950s he was a violinist in the Philharmonia Orchestra.  Gradually he became known as a conductor through his BBC broadcasts, and also appeared on television with an orchestra of lady musicians – Michael Freedman and his Debutantes, who can be heard on GLCD5150 and 5155. He made a number of recordings for Oriole records, and the Embassy label, which Oriole produced for Woolworths.  The Oriole recordings were always credited to him but Embassy sometimes used the pseudonyms Serge Lamont, Lionel Hale and Jacques Leroy. As the last named he also appears on this CD conducting a spirited arrangement of Mexican Hat Dance. This comes from the fertile imagination of Ronald Hanmer (1917-1994), a very prolific English musician who claimed that he was always fully employed throughout his professional career. This embraced composing (over 700 works), arranging (especially for amateur theatricals and brass bands), and film scores.

The English pianist and composer William Blezard (1921-2003) was closely associated with Joyce Grenfell for many years, but she was just one of many distinguished performers for whom he was the accompanying pianist of choice. Dance Of The Tarantulas was one of his early compositions, from a time when he was also in demand for film work. Although he continued to write, he seems to have preferred broadcasting and the concert hall, rather than production music.

The first on the list intended specifically for dancing is Moonspun Dreams, which the record label tells us is a "Dream Saunter". It comes from a prolific series of Old Time dance records by Harry Davidson (1892-1967) and his Orchestra for EMI’s Columbia label. After a distinguished career as an organist and conductor, in November 1943 his long-running radio series "Those Were The Days" appeared for the first time, providing listeners at home with a regular helping of melodious Old Time dance music.

Londoner Montague Fawcett Phillips (1885-1969) worked in the same areas as his peers Eric Coates and Haydn Wood, except that most of his ballads possibly lacked something which would have made them popular to the masses, and thus they have tended to be forgotten. But Phillips did succeed in a musical genre that failed to survive the last century, the operetta: his "Rebel Maid" (1921) still gets occasional amateur performances, helped by its ‘hit’ song The Fishermen of England. Disliking the influences of jazz and syncopation in the 1920s, Phillips thereafter concentrated on ‘traditional’ orchestral music, much of it in lighter vein such as Pirouette.

Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880) was actually born in Cologne, Germany, but he is widely regarded as one of the leading French composers of the 19th Century. His Apache Dance has survived numerous comic interpretations, but thankfully Harry Fryer (1896-1946) shows it some respect. He packed a lot into his relatively short career, and became a household name in Britain largely through his regular appearances on the "Music While You Work" radio programme.

Sidney Torch, MBE (born in London, Sidney Torchinsky 1908-1990) is well-known in Britain for his numerous Parlophone recordings, as well as his long tenure as conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in the "Friday Night Is Music Night" BBC programme. He wrote some excellent light music cameos for the Chappell Recorded Music Library, and he conducted the Queen’s Hall Light Orchestra for many of them, such as his bright and breezy march Banner Of Youth.

Meredith Willson (1902-1984) will always be remembered for his hit musical "The Music Man", which was a big success on Broadway and later a Hollywood film. But he also composed and conducted some attractive pieces of Light Music, some to be found on an early Brunswick 10" LP called "Encore". Several have already appeared on Guild CDs, and Piccolo Polka can now be added to the list.

Morton Gould (1913-1996) became one of the most highly respected American composers, and his distinguished career was crowned with a Pulitzer Prize (for his Stringmusic, commissioned by Mstislav Rostropovich for the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington) just a year before his death at the age of 82. Like other prolific composers who have achieved fame with a number of their works, some of his remaining output gets unfairly neglected. Gould’s Cresta Blanca Waltz seems to fall into this category, which may make it a pleasant surprise for many listeners.

David Rose (1910-1990) was one of the biggest names in American light music circles during the middle years of the 20th century. Born in London, England ‘lost’ him when the family moved to the USA when he was aged just four, but he retained a love for his birthplace and in his later life his fascination with steam railways often brought him back across the Atlantic. A prolific composer and arranger, he is an established Guild favourite, and Dancing Cane may have been one of his lesser known works, but it has the hallmarks of the master musician stamped all over it.

Another Guild favourite is Toronto-born Percy Faith (1908-1976) who moved permanently to the USA in 1940 where he quickly established himself through radio and recordings. From the 1950s onwards his fame spread internationally, due to the great success of his numerous long playing albums. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Faith arranged all his own material, and he was quick off the mark to record an album of music from "My Fair Lady" when that musical caused such a stir as soon as it opened on Broadway. Many of the tunes have become familiar standards, but the score was packed with so many good numbers that some have been almost forgotten, such as Ascot Gavotte.

Helmut Zacharias (1920-2002) was a German child prodigy who rose to prominence in the 1950s when the American Forces Network in Frankfurt described him as ‘the best jazz violinist in the world’. During his long career he composed over 400 works and his album sales exceeded 13 million. When he turned his attention to the traditional West Indian song Yellow Bird he decided to rename it Calypso in D.

Frank Perkins (1908-1988) studied music in both America and Europe and he became noticed in 1934 following a successful collaboration with lyricist Mitchell Parrish which resulted in Stars Fell on Alabama and Emmaline. In 1937 he was engaged as an arranger by Warner Bros. in Hollywood, where he remained until the mid-1960s. Later he tended to concentrate more on light orchestral works for concert performance producing some pleasing melodies such as Feliciana. In 1962 Frank received an Oscar nomination for his work scoring the musical "Gypsy".

In 1955 the English composer Anthony Mawer (1930-1999) started contributing occasional mood music pieces to London publishers De Wolfe, before joining the staff in 1959, where he remained until 1965. During this period he composed almost 500 titles exclusively for them, and Song Of Tonfano is just one of many delightful melodies he has created – several have already reached a wider audience through Guild. One could question whether this piece should appear in a collection of dance music, but film directors in ballroom scenes where the action concentrates on two actors always seem to need smoochy music like this. Perhaps it could be described as a very slow, slow foxtrot.

The French composer/conductor Roger Roger (1911-1995) is a prolific contributor to Guild ‘Golden Age of Light Music’ collections. Vive Le Sport is one of those marches which Eric Coates defied listeners to try to dance.

Dolf van der Linden (real name David Gysbert van der Linden, 1915-1999) was the leading figure on the light music scene in the Netherlands from the 1940s until the 1980s. As well as broadcasting frequently with his Metropole Orchestra, he made numerous recordings for the background music libraries of major music publishers. He also made transcription recordings for Dutch radio and other companies. His commercial recordings (especially for the American market) were often labelled as ‘Van Lynn’ or ‘Daniel De Carlo’. The opening of Evening Bells may make one wonder where the melody is going, but it soon evolves into a very appealing tango.

Englishman Malcolm NevilleLockyer (1923-1976) became well-known to the British public largely due to the fact that he notched up almost 6,000 broadcasts during his prolific career. After war service in the Royal Air Force, he was engaged as pianist and arranger with the famous Ambrose band, and he also worked with Cyril Stapleton and Robert Farnon before forming his own orchestra for broadcasting in 1951. He discovered a talent for composing and scored some thirty films and television series, in 1960 succeeding Harry Rabinowitz as the conductor of the BBC Revue Orchestra. On this CD he conducts Fifth Avenue Waltz by New Yorker Robert Mersey (b. 1917) who as well as being a composer and musical director, produced some of Columbia Records’ most successful 1960s vocals, such as the Andy Williams hit Moon River.

Werner Müller (1920-1998) is also a well-established Guild favourite, sometimes under his familiar pseudonym ‘Ricardo Santos’. By the early 1960s his orchestra had become firmly established internationally, and Dance Ballerina Dance comes from one of his top-selling albums of that era.

Felix Slatkin (1915-1963) was born in St Louis, Missouri, and he became a leading violinist and conductor. His entertaining version of the traditional melody Golden Slippers was created not long before he died in 1963 from a heart attack aged only 47.

Boosey & Hawkes’ New Concert Orchestra provide three contrasting dances by leading composers. Vivian Ellis (1903-1996) will always be remembered in light music circles for Coronation Scot (on GLCD5120 & 5181) and Alpine Pastures (GLCD5169). They were both for Chappells, but later he wrote several highly regarded works for Boosey & Hawkes, including his charming Interval Waltz. Regular collectors of this Guild series of CDs will already be familiar with the music of Trevor Duncan (real name Leonard Charles Trebilco, 1924-2005), and among the best-known are his first success High Heels (on Guild GLCD 5124), Grand Vista (GLCD 5124) and Panoramic Splendour (GLCD5111). He could turn his hand to many varied styles, and Rhumba For Romeos finds him in a Latin-American mood. Herbert Geoffrey Henman (b. 1896) was known for writing popular songs in the frothy style that was in vogue before World War II. He also contributed to stage shows, and one of his best known pieces of light music was Champagne March (on GLCD5103)for the Chappell Recorded Music Library. Pretty Polka appears to have been his only work accepted by Boosey & Hawkes for their mood music library. During the 1930s Haydn Wood orchestrated some of his melodies, and even lent him £2,500 in 1949 to buy a house in Sussex. The last two titles by the New Concert Orchestra were conducted by Monia Liter (1906-1988), at the time the Recorded Music Manager at Boosey & Hawkes.

Venus Waltz by Ron Goodwin (1925-2003) originally appeared on a Parlophone LP ‘Out Of This World’. The German violin maestro Hans Georg Arlt (1927-2011) gave it his usual polished performance. This leads us to a barn-storming performance of Millionaire’s Hoe-Down by Chicago-born Herman Clebanoff (1917-2004).

Our final track is the light classical work which gives this collection of music its title. The German composer Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (1786-1826) wrote Invitation To The Dance (sometimes called Invitation To The Waltz) as a piano work; it was highly regarded and was orchestrated at different times by Berlioz and Liszt. In 1956 it was the turn of the Mantovani Orchestra, in which the glorious cascading string sound briefly surfaces, but this recording (which has been edited) is basically true to the best-known version of this popular work.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5205

Here’s To Holidays

1 Skyways (Walter Stott)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by WALTER STOTT
Chappell C 756 1962
2 Arrivederci Roma (Renato Rascel; Carl Sigman)
RICHARD HAYMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury MG 20235 1957
3 Costa Brava (Philip Buchel)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 742 1962
4 Indiana (James Hanley; Ballard MacDonald)
RED NICHOLS AND THE AUGMENTED PENNIES
Capitol T 999 1957
5 En Bateau Mouche (Alain Nancey)
ROGER ROGER Conducting THE MODE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Vogue Mode MDINT 9080 1962
6 Here’s To Holidays (Iain Sutherland)
SYMPHONIA ORCHESTRA Conducted by CURT ANDERSEN
Charles Brull/Harmonic CBL 477 1961
7 Venus And Back (Howard Shaw, real name Malcolm Lockyer)
BRUCE CAMPBELL AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Coronet Orchestra’ on disc label)
MGM 30852 1953
8 The Wine Harvest (Trevor Duncan, real name Leonard Charles Trebilco)
THE NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CEDRIC DUMONT
Boosey & Hawkes OT 2308 1958
9 Holiday Bound (Clifton Johns)
THE SYDNEY LIGHT CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by HAL EVANS
Columbia 33OS 7575 1962
10 Midsummer Madness (Ivor Slaney)
IVOR SLANEY AND HIS ORCHESTRA featuring DOLORES VENTURA, piano
HMV 45-POP 943 1961
11 Jamaica Road (Dolf Van Der Linden)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Harmonic Orchestra conducted by David Johnson’ on disc label)
Charles Brull/ Harmonic CBL 334 1953
12 Transcontinental (Robert Docker)
THE ENVOY STRINGS
Envoy ENV 001 1962
13 The Only Way To Travel (featured in the film "The Road To Hong Kong") (Sammy Cahn; James Van Heusen, arr. Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Liberty LOS 17002 1962
14 French Flirt (John Carmichael)
TELECAST ORCHESTRA Conducted by CHARLES WILLIAMS
Chappell C 733 1962
15 "Tiara Tahiti" – theme from the film (Philip Green)
PHILIP GREEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia 45-DB 4851 1962
16 Beachboy (Peter Dennis, real name Dennis Alfred Berry)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Harmonic Orchestra conducted by David Johnson’ on disc label)
Charles Brull/ Harmonic CBL 352 1954
17 Camel Train (Steve Race)
PETER KNIGHT AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Pye 7N 15472 1962
18 Water Skiing – from "Summer" – Suite (Toni Leutwiler)
WESTWAY STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Southern MQ 572 1962
19 Rickshaw (Annunzio Paolo Mantovani)
MANTOVANI AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca 45-F 11500 1962
20 The Olive Grove (Trevor Duncan, real name Leonard Charles Trebilco)
THE NEW CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CEDRIC DUMONT
Boosey & Hawkes OT 2308 1958
21 Holiday Highway (Anthony Mawer)
HILVERSUM RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by HUGO DE GROOT
De Wolfe DW 2718 1962
22 Oo La La (Sidney Torch)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CHARLES WILLIAMS
Chappell C 770 1962
23 Volare (Domenico Modugno, arr. William Hill Bowen)
THE HILL BOWEN CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conducted by HILL BOWEN
Reader’s Digest RDS 6006 1962
24 Haiti (Joseph F. Kuhn)
THE RIO CARNIVAL ORCHESTRA
Stereo Fidelity SF-5900 1958
25 One Night In Monte Carlo (Werner Richard Heymann)
MONTE CARLO LIGHT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conducted by ERWIN HALLETZ
Polydor 237078 SLPHM 1962
Stereo: tracks 13, 23-25; rest in mono.

BOOKLET NOTES

It’s always fun planning future holidays, and the anticipation can be an important element in the experience. With this in mind, we offer a collection which may help to stimulate your interest in some far away glamorous destinations, and the means of reaching them. All you now need is the sense of adventure, and the money to pay for it all!

The honour of providing the opening piece of music goes to Walter ‘Wally’ Stott (1924-2009) with Skyways, one of many works he contributed to the Chappell Recorded Music Library. In 1972 he became Angela Morley, and was soon recognised as one of the finest arrangers and film composers. She eventually relocated to the Los Angeles area, where she worked on several big budget movies - one example is the "Star Wars" series assisting John Williams. She also contributed scores to prestigious TV shows such as "Dallas" and "Dynasty", and provided many arrangements for the Boston ‘Pops’ Orchestra.

Richard (Warren Joseph) Hayman (b. 1920) worked on the MGM musical "Meet Me In St. Louis" and was put under contract by Mercury Records in 1950. Over a period of more than 30 years he also arranged for the Boston Pops, serving as back-up conductor for Arthur Fiedler. An established Guild favourite (this is his 24th appearance), Arrivederci Roma provides a truly nostalgic moment for everyone who has visited and fallen in love with Italy.

Philip Buchel may be known to some film buffs as a choreographer on some British films in the post-war period. He worked with producer Herbert Wilcox, who also commissioned Robert Farnon to provide scores for some of his most memorable films – the most prestigious one being "Spring In Park Lane" (1948). Farnon would have appreciated Buchel’s expertise (often with his wife Betty Buchel) and it seems likely that he encouraged his composing aspirations. Farnon and Buchel collaborated on Jockey On The Carousel (on GLCD5131) but the sole composing credit for Costa Brava went to Buchel.

Ernest Loring "Red" Nichols (1905-1965) was an American cornet player whose talent brought him into the realms of the most famous musicians of the jazz era. He played with many of the legendary names, and his own group ‘Red Nichols and his Five Pennies’ even prompted a Hollywood biopic in 1959 starring Danny Kaye: he played trumpet on the soundtrack, but didn’t appear on screen. Indiana finds him expanding into easy listening territory – possibly in response to changing styles where his work in jazz circles was less in demand, although he was a very busy session musician.

The French composer/conductor Roger Roger (1911-1995) is a prolific contributor to Guild ‘Golden Age of Light Music’ collections – 17 so far and still counting. En Bateau Mouche describes a trip on one of those distinctive pleasure boats on the River Seine in Paris.

The composer of our title track is the Scottish violinist and conductor Iain Sutherland (born Glasgow,18 May 1936), who is making his Guild debut with his carefree melody Here’s To Holidays. At the time when he composed this piece he was working for the London music publishers Charles Brull, often arranging works by other composers. Today he is widely acclaimed internationally for his work conducting numerous major orchestras, and to list all his achievements in broadcasting, recording studios, the theatre, films and television could fill this booklet. Iain Sutherland’s repertoire encompasses baroque, classical, romantic and contemporary works, as well as the lighter repertoire of Vienna, Hollywood and Broadway. In May 2005 he conducted the premiere of Robert Farnon’s Third Symphony, dedicated to the city of Edinburgh.

The composer of Venus and Back was the Englishman Malcolm NevilleLockyer (1923-1976) who might be described as a typical backroom boy in the music business. He became well-known to the British public largely due to the fact that he notched up almost 6,000 broadcasts during his prolific career. After war service in the Royal Air Force, he was engaged as pianist and arranger with the famous Ambrose band, and he also worked with Cyril Stapleton and Robert Farnon before forming his own orchestra for broadcasting in 1951. He discovered a talent for composing and scored some thirty films and television series, in 1960 succeeding Harry Rabinowitz as the conductor of the BBC Revue Orchestra.

Regular collectors of this Guild series of CDs will already be familiar with the music of Trevor Duncan (real name Leonard Charles Trebilco, 1924-2005). No less than 30 of his original compositions have now been reissued, and among the best-known are his first success High Heels (on Guild GLCD 5124), Grand Vista (GLCD 5124) and Panoramic Splendour (GLCD5111). He had the ability to write in many different styles, which no doubt endeared him to the publishers of mood music who needed to have music readily available to cover any kind of situation. The Wine Harvest and The Olive Grove confirm his mastery of being able to convey just the perfect atmosphere of the music.

Holiday Bound introduces two new names to Guild light music circles: composer Clifton Johns from Adelaide, and conductor Hal Evans. Apart from being described on the LP sleeve as a young Australian, information on Clifton Johns’ career is sparse. The conductor of the Sydney Light Concert Orchestra first came to our attention on GLCD5184 as the arranger of Handley’s Seaside Holiday. Hal Evans (1906-1998) was born in England, where he had a successful career with the BBC as a pianist and accompanist, then being appointed the Music Director for Pathe Films. He also arranged for the Luton Girls Choir, but an approach to work in Sydney in 1949 resulted in him settling in Australia for the rest of his life. In Sydney, he became the composer/director of the Australian Performing Rights Association. He formed and served as president of the Fellowship of Australian Composers for many years. He also had a close association with the ABC and the Australian Elizabethan Trust.

Dolores Ventura enjoyed a busy performing and recording career in Britain during the 1950s, sometimes with an orchestra conducted by her husband Ivor Slaney (1921-1998). He was also a successful composer and was a fine oboe player, regularly doing session work under top conductors such as Robert Farnon. Midsummer Madness is certainly a showcase for Ivor’s wife, and some of his previous compositions featured in Guild are Country Canter (GLCD5164), Donkey Doodle (GLCD5131) and The Show Goes On (GLGD5149). His more serious works include a Brazilian Suite and an Oboe Concerto.

We are back in familiar Guild ‘territory’ with Dolf van der Linden (real name David Gysbert van der Linden, 1915-1999). He was the leading figure on the light music scene in the Netherlands from the 1940s until the 1980s. As well as broadcasting frequently with his Metropole Orchestra, he made numerous recordings for the background music libraries of major music publishers. His commercial recordings were often labelled as ‘Van Lynn’ or ‘Daniel De Carlo’. Dolf van der Linden has already appeared on more than 35 Guild CDs, and his inventive compositions such as Jamaica Road will ensure his deserved place in the Light Music Hall of Fame.

London born Robert Docker (1918-1992) was a regular broadcaster, mainly as a pianist, but also through his activities ‘behind the scenes’ as a composer and arranger, working closely with people such as Sidney Torch. One of his best known works was Legend – the widely praised HMV recording by the George Melachrino Orchestra is on Guild GLCD5173. Transcontinental joins the ranks of exciting works with a railway theme.

In 1962 cinema audiences saw the final film in the famous ‘Road’ series which had begun in Singapore way back in 1940. Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour were reunited for "The Road To Hong Kong" which was filmed at Shepperton Studios in England. The musical director was Robert Farnon (1917-2005), and in the LP accompanying the film’s release he reworked some of the music written by songwriters Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen – including The Only Way To Travel.

The Australian pianist and composer John Carmichael (b. 1930) has contributed a few appealing works to production music libraries, although most of his professional career has centred around more serious works. He was a pioneer in the field of music therapy including projects at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, where the Paraplegic Olympics was born. He has lived in London for much of his life, and has composed works for piano, flute and trumpet: his ‘Concierto Folklorico’ has received wide acclaim, and he played the piano on its commercial release. His charming piece French Flirt makes one wish that he might have spent more of his time creating enjoyable pieces of light music such as this.

Philip Green (born Harry Philip Green 1911-1982) began his professional career at the age of eighteen playing in various orchestras. His long recording career began with EMI in 1933, and he is credited with at least 150 film scores, including "Tiara Tahiti". A compulsive worker, he appeared in countless radio programmes and also composed numerous pieces of mood music for major London publishers including Chappell & Co., Francis Day & Hunter, Paxton and EMI’s Photoplay Music.

‘Peter Dennis’ hides the true identity of English composer Dennis Alfred Berry (1921-1994), who also wrote (sometimes in collaboration with others) under names such as Frank Sterling, Charles Kenbury and Michael Rodney. For part of the 1950s he ran the Paxton library, and Holiday in Hollywood (on GLCD5119) was probably his biggest success for them. At the end of the 1950s Dennis Berry was head-hunted to start the Southern Library of Recorded Music. Eventually he emigrated to South Africa, before finally returning to England where he died in June 1994. During his long career he started out as a music copyist and arranged for top bands such as Carroll Gibbons, The Squadronaires and Ted Heath. He eventually became one of the leading composers, arrangers and producers in London’s thriving production music industry. Beachboy joins more than ten of his compositions already reissued by Guild.

The British pianist, composer, radio and television presenter Steve (Stephen Russell) Race, OBE (1921-2009) first made his mark as a pianist and arranger with many top British bands of the post-war years. His wide-ranging career also embraced conducting for many TV shows, and he was a popular compere of panel games and music programmes. Camel Train is his fifth composition to be featured in this series of CDs.

As ‘Tom Wyler’, the Swiss violinist and composer Toni Leutwiler (1923-2009) became known outside his homeland, partly due to the success of his charming composition Lovely Day,featured in its original version on Guild GLCD5183, but which Frank Chacksfield also recorded commercially for Columbia. His music was in demand from many broadcasting stations, and he was reported to have created over 2,000 arrangements. He also contributed to several production music companies, including the Southern Music Library which published Water Skiing from his "Summer" Suite.

Annunzio Paolo Mantovani (1905-1980) became the conductor of one of the most famous light orchestras from the 1950s onwards. Born in Venice, his family came to England when he was aged four and he was something of a prodigy on the violin by the time he reached sixteen. But he leaned more towards popular music, and fronted many different kinds of ensembles before long-playing records brought him worldwide acclaim. Despite a very busy schedule embracing radio, television, concerts and recordings he also found time to compose and arrange for his magnificent orchestra, and Rickshaw reveals a talent that few of his many admirers appreciated.

In 1955 the English composer Anthony Mawer (1930-1999) started contributing occasional mood music pieces to London publishers De Wolfe, before joining the staff in 1959, where he remained until 1965. During this period he composed almost 500 titles exclusively for them, and Holiday Highway is just one of many delightful melodies he has created – this is his sixth to reach a wider audience through Guild.

Sidney Torch, MBE (born in London, Sidney Torchinsky 1908-1990) is well-known in Britain for his numerous Parlophone recordings, as well as his long tenure as conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in the "Friday Night Is Music Night" BBC radio programme. Oo La La is one of his many compositions for the Chappell Recorded Music Library.

The nostalgic sound of Italy returns with a song that achieved world-wide popularity in 1958 after it won the 8th San Remo Music Festival. Our version is arranged and conducted by William Hill-Bowen (1918-1964) who worked closely with George Melachrino for many years. But by the time he made this recording in 1962 he had been recognised in his own right, thanks mainly to RCA in America.

Our holiday excursion approaches its climax on Haiti, a magical island in the Caribbean which has fascinated countless travellers for generations. When stereo discs were launched in the second half of the 1950s, record producers did not hesitate to tempt the public with exotic sounding titles that disguised the fact that they were probably not quite what they may have seemed. The Paris Theatre Orchestra, together with 101 Strings and The Rio Carnival Orchestra, were names used by the American Miller International Company on their bargain basement priced Essex, Somerset and Stereo Fidelity labels. The recordings usually employed various European symphony and radio orchestras and were linked by the name of Joseph Francis Kuhn (1924-1962) who composed, arranged, scored or conducted most of the early ones. Doubtless there would have been many more recordings by him in later years, had it not been for his untimely death in March 1962 at the age of 37.

All holidays eventually have to come to an end and our grand finale is One Night In Monte Carlo, composed by Werner Richard Heymann for a 1931 German comedy "Bomben Auf Monte Carlo". It provides the first Guild appearance of the Monte Carlo Light Symphony Orchestra conducted by Erwin Halletz (1923-2008). He was born in Vienna and, in addition to conducting, he was also a busy arranger and performer on the saxophone and clarinet.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5206

Non-Stop To Nowhere

1 On The Side Of The Angels (from the show "Fiorello") (Sheldon Harnick; Jerry Bock, arr. Alfred Newman)
ALFRED NEWMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Capitol ST1343 1959
2 Harum-Scarum (Florian ZaBach)
FLORIAN ZABACH, HIS VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA
Mercury MPT7522 1957
3 Poor Butterfly (Raymond Hubbell; John Golden, arr. Philip Green)
PHILIP GREEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Top Rank RX 3013 1959
4 "The Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse" - Love Theme from the film (Andre Previn, arr. Percy Faith)
PERCY FAITH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8583 1962
5 Ballad Of The Sea (Joe Reisman, arr. Walter Landauer)
RAWICZ AND LANDAUER at two pianos with Orchestra and Chorus conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Philips 326547 BF 1962
6 Non-Stop To Nowhere (Mark Anthony, real name Tony Hatch)
THE PICCADILLY STRINGS
Piccadilly 7N 35027 1962
7 The Awakening Of Pedro (Mitchell Ayres; Danny Hurd)
MITCHELL AYRES AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA 47-6729 1956
8 Antilles (Jacques La Rue; Jean Paul Rene Guilbert)
JOE REISMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA Victor 6404 1956
9 Desiree (James Kriegsmann, arr. Bruce Campbell)
BRUCE CAMPBELL AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Coronet Orchestra’ on disc label)
MGM E 3167 1955
10 Grasshopper (Earle H. Hagen, Herbert Spencer)
THE SPENCER-HAGEN ORCHESTRA
Label "X" LXA 1003 1955
11 Piccadilly Hoe-Down (Chris Armstrong, real name Ray Martin)
RAY MARTIN AND HIS CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Columbia DB 3026 1952
12 Badinage (Roger Roger)
ROGER ROGER Conducting THE MODE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Vogue Mode MDINT 9080 1962
13 Hey! Taxi (George Siravo)
GEORGE SIRAVO AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca DL 8464 1956
14 Poppet (Ken Warner)
THE CRAWFORD LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Josef Weinberger JW 156 1958
15 Candy Floss (Peter Dennis, real name Dennis Alfred Berry)
DOLF VAN DER LINDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA (‘Harmonic Orchestra conducted by David Johnson’ on disc label)
Charles Brull/ Harmonic CBL 334 1953
16 Metropolitan March (Roger Barsotti)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by SIDNEY TORCH
Chappell C 313 1947
17 Frantic Fiddles (Johnny Gregory)
WESTWAY STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Southern MQ 593 1962
18 Folies Parade (Cyril Watters)
LANSDOWNE LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Impress IA 233 1960
19 Twinkle Toes (Van Phillips)
STUTTGART RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by KURT REHFELD (‘Lansdowne Light Orchestra’ on disc label)
Impress IA 131-B 1956
20 Pennsylvania Dutch (Dolf van der Linden)
SYMPHONIA ORCHESTRA Conducted by LUDO PHILIPP
Harmonic/Charles Brull CBL 385 1955
21 Jamboree (Clive Richardson)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 343 1948
22 Starlight Special (Alan Perry, real name Ernest Tomlinson)
NEW CENTURY ORCHESTRA Conducted by ERICH BÖRSCHEL
Francis, Day & Hunter FDH 155 1956
23 Ten To One (Arnold Steck, real name Leslie Statham)
DANISH STATE RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by ROBERT FARNON
Chappell C 469 1954
24 Down Channel : Nautical Overture (Alec Rowley)
LONDON PROMENADE ORCHESTRA Conducted by WALTER COLLINS
Paxton PR 402 1946
25 Toward Adventure (Gilbert Vinter)
STUTTGART RADIO ORCHESTRA Conducted by KURT REHFELD (‘Lansdowne Light Orchestra’ on disc label)
Impress IA 169-B 1957
26 All The Fun Of The Fair (from "Rustic Revels" Suite) (Percy Fletcher)
QUEEN’S HALL LIGHT ORCHESTRA Conducted by CHARLES WILLIAMS
Chappell C 127 1942

Stereo: tracks 1-4; rest in mono

BOOKLET NOTES

The title of this collection says it all: simply an assortment of all kinds of Light Music, with a good proportion of it included at the special request of music lovers who have purchased previous CDs in this long running series.

The opening track features a great show business number arranged by Alfred Newman (1901-1970) who was, for much of his career, the most influential and respected composer and music director in Hollywood. At Twentieth Century Fox he was responsible for numerous major films, sometimes taken from successful Broadway shows. One exception was "Fiorello" (about the famous New York mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia), for which Frank Sinatra was mooted for the starring role. It never happened, although Newman did some preparatory work on the music score and On The Side Of The Angels is reputed to be a composite of what was intended as the Main Title and Ending of the film.

Florian ZaBach (1918-2006) was an American violinist and conductor who became a well-known television personality in post-war years. His 78 The Hot Canary (1951)sold a million, and during a long career he was invited as violinist and conductor to perform many ‘Pops Concerts’ with orchestras around the world. Harum-Scarum is one of his compositions.

Londoner Philip Green (born Harry Philip Green 1911-1982) began his professional career at the age of eighteen playing in various orchestras. Within a year he became London’s youngest West End conductor at the Prince of Wales Theatre. His long recording career began with EMI in 1933, and he is credited with at least 150 film scores. His own arrangement of Poor Butterfly reveals Green’s ability to come up with fresh ideas for familiar standards.

André Previn (born Andreas Ludwig Priwin in Berlin 1929, or 1930) has enjoyed a glittering career as a conductor, pianist and composer. In 1969 he was appointed conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra, where he remained for over ten years. The fame he achieved in London tended to overshadow the fact that he had already forged a successful career in Hollywood, resulting in four Academy Awards. The 1961 adaptation of "The Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse" failed to impress the critics, but Previn’s score – arranged in our recording by Percy Faith (1908-1976) – deserves to be remembered.

Rawicz and Landauer were a very popular piano duo, heard regularly on the radio in Britain for many years. Marjan Rawicz (1898-1970) was born in Poland, while Walter Landauer (1910-1983) came from Vienna. Initially they formed their act in Austria in 1932, but soon moved to Britain. Walter Landauer was also an accomplished arranger and, in the early 1960s, Philips Records in the UK commissioned him to write a number of arrangements, notably of some original works by Robert Farnon (1917-2005) and Leroy Anderson (1908-1975), which were recorded under Farnon’s baton, sometimes with a choir. Most titles were for release on LPs, but Ballad Of The Sea was one of several 45 singles. The composer was Joe Reisman (1924-1987), who returns later on this CD with his own orchestra playing Antilles. Born in Dallas, Texas, he began his career playing saxophone and arranging but later held A&R appointments with Roulette and RCA.

Our title track is by a young English composer who would eventually go on to make a big name for himself internationally. Tony (Anthony Peter) Hatch (born Pinner, North London, 1939) studied for a while at the Royal Academy of Music but left to work in the office of a music publisher. While doing his National Service he became involved with the Band of the Coldstream Guards, then returned to work with several different record companies including Pye and Top Rank. His career took a big leap forward when he started writing songs for Petula Clark, becoming her regular producer: Downtown was their first great success. Before that he wrote a number of catchy tunes, often under the pseudonym ‘Mark Anthony’ – one of them being Non Stop To Nowhere.

Making his Guild debut on this CD is the American conductor Mitchell Ayres (1909-1969). He was also an accomplished composer and arranger and is best remembered for his work with Perry Como on radio, television and records. He was the co-composer of the intriguingly titled The Awakening Of Pedro. His career was cut short when he was killed in a traffic accident.

Bruce Campbell was one of several writers who owed much to his association with Robert Farnon. He was a fellow Canadian, who actually came to Britain some years before Farnon, and played trombone with various top British bands during the 1930s. Campbell assisted Farnon on his post-war BBC radio shows and eventually became a frequent contributor to various mood music libraries. Desiree comes from a rare LP that Campbell recorded anonymously in Britain for the American market.

Herbert Spencer (1905-1992) began contributing music to films as early as 1933, and during the 1950s he made several albums with Earle Hagen (1919-2008 – famous as the composer of the jazz standard Harlem Nocturne). The Spencer Hagen Orchestra is still remembered today by collectors of what has become known in the USA as ‘lounge music’. They co-composed Grasshopper, which comes from an LP with each track devoted to a cocktail. Two other tracks from the same album have been featured on previous Guild CDs: Side Car (GLCD5131) and Silver Fizz (GLCD5156).

Raymond (Ray) Stuart Martin (born Raymond Wolfgang Kohn in Vienna, 1918-1988) fled from the Nazis and settled in England before the outbreak of World War 2 where he became known as ‘Ray Martin’. He was one of the biggest names in British popular music during the 1950s due to his work on radio, television, films and especially the recording studios. Piccadilly Hoe-Down was composed under his pseudonym ‘Chris Armstrong’ – he used at least ten at various times, much to the confusion of his admirers.

After the Second World War Roger Roger (1911-1995) played piano and conducted a 35-piece orchestra for a major French weekly radio series "Paris Star Time". His own instrumental cameos that were featured in the show brought him to the attention of the London publishers Chappell & Co., who were rapidly expanding their Recorded Music Library of background music at that time. Roger’s quirky compositions soon became available to radio, television and film companies around the world, but the choice for this CD, Badinage, comes from one of his commercial LPs.

George Siravo (1916-2000) played clarinet with many of the big bands of the swing era and he was also in demand as a free-lance arranger for the likes of Glenn Miller, Charlie Barnet, Artie Shaw and Gene Krupa. Siravo’s contribution to this CD, Hey! Taxi,represents one of the rare novelty numbers that he both composed and recorded himself.

Ken Warner (born in London as Onslow Boyden Waldo Warner 1902-1988), was educated at the Guildhall School of Music. By 1940 he had become well known as ‘Ken Warner’ and in that year he joined the BBC Light Orchestra, playing violin, clarinet and saxophone under Fred Hartley, also doing much arranging. He stayed as a BBC employee until 1959, after which he retired to Cornwall to raise pigs. His compositions (such as Poppet on this CD) found their way into the Recorded Music Libraries of London publishers.

‘Peter Dennis’ hides the true identity of Dennis Alfred Berry (1921-1994), who also composed (sometimes in collaboration with others) under names such as Frank Sterling, Charles Kenbury and Michael Rodney. He was born in London and in 1939 was employed by several publishers before joining Paxton Music as their representative based in Amsterdam. He returned to the London office in 1949 and was responsible for producing numerous titles issued by Paxton during the 1950s. This did not prevent him writing for other libraries such as De Wolfe, Synchro and Charles Brull, for whom he wrote Candy Floss.

London-born Roger Barsotti (1901-1986) was a conductor and composer whose career began as a flautist with the Hastings Municipal Orchestra. Later he was appointed bandmaster of the Queen's Royal Regiment in 1930 and, following retirement from the British army in 1946, he took over the London Metropolitan Police Band, for whom he composed his Metropolitan March. Later it achieved fame as the signature tune for the British TV programme "Blott On The Landscape".

Johnny Gregory (born Giovanni Gregori, London 1924) is a prolific arranger and film composer whose career with Philips records spanned some 20 years. As "Chaquito" he arranged and conducted a series of Latin-American recordings. Essentially he was a backroom boy in the British music business for many years, with numerous arrangements, backings and radio broadcasts to his credit. His compositions, such as Frantic Fiddles, were also welcomed by mood music libraries.

Although not as well-known to the general public as some of his peers, Henry Cyril Watters (1907-1984) was another composer, highly respected by music publishers, whose work was readily accepted for its unfailing high standards. At times he was employed as a staff arranger by Boosey & Hawkes and Chappell, and for many years he willingly devoted some of his energies in running the Light Music Society for the benefit of his fellow musicians. He achieved a minor hit with his Willow Waltz (on GLCD5189)when it was used in Britain as a television theme, but possibly the number on this CD – Folies Parade – is more typical of his many bright and breezy melodies.

The American Van Phillips (1905-1992) was a respected member of London’s dance band fraternity from the late 1920s onwards, but after the Second World War he discovered a new talent for writing background music. Many of his works such as Twinkle Toes were accepted by Inter-Art Music Publishers (Impress), and some admirers have noted possible influences of Robert Farnon and Bruce Campbell. He also worked on a major BBC Radio series "Journey Into Space", first broadcast in 1953. When composing failed to satisfy his creative instincts he eventually became a highly regarded professional photographer.

A musician who is already well represented on Guild Light Music CDs is Dolf Van Der Linden (1915-1999), who conducts his own piece Pennsylvania Dutch. His real name was David Gysbert van der Linden and he was the leading figure on the light music scene in the Netherlands from the 1940s until the 1980s.

Clive Richardson (1909-1998) was best-known as a pianist during his early career, but working on many pre-war British films (usually without any credit on-screen) honed his talents as an arranger and composer. His London Fantasia (on Guild GLCD5120) was widely praised and thereafter his work was regularly commissioned by many leading publishers. It seems likely that Chappells commissioned him to compose Jamboree in a similar style to his earlier Holiday Spirit (on GLCD5120) which had been so successful.

Ernest Tomlinson(b.1924) is one of Britain’s most talented composers, working mainly in light music, but also highly regarded for his choral works and brass band pieces. During a very productive career he has contributed numerous titles to the recorded music libraries of many different publishers, often under the pseudonym ‘Alan Perry’, which he chose for Starlight Special on this CD. His suites of English Folk Dances have become part of the standard light music repertoire. In recent years Ernest has worked hard to preserve thousands of music manuscripts that would otherwise have been destroyed, and he is the President of the Light Music Society. In 2012 he received a well-deserved MBE for his services to music.

Arnold Steck (1905-1974) is a pseudonym used by Major Leslie Statham, conductor of the Band of the Welsh Guards, who retired from the regiment in 1962 to concentrate fully on composing. Not surprisingly he was a master of concert marches and two of his compositions were used by the BBC for many years to introduce their football and tennis programmes. Ten To One on this CD is a fine example of his work.

The English composer Alec Rowley (1892-1958) became known for his educational music aimed at amateur players, which seems to have resulted in his more serious works being unfairly neglected. He studied with Frederick Corder at London’s Royal Academy of Music, and became familiar to early radio listeners as a piano duettist with Edgar Moy. His Piano Concerto No. 1 was premiered in 1938. He makes his Guild debut with his Nautical Overture Down Channel.

Lincoln-born Gilbert Vinter (1909-1969) is probably best remembered in Britain as the conductor of the BBC Midland Light Orchestra when it was one of the foremost contributors of quality light music on the BBC. However he also excelled as a composer, both in light music (such as Toward Adventure on this CD) and the brass band world.

The work selected to complete this collection is a typical piece by Derby-born Percy (Eastman) Fletcher (1879-1932), who is often recognised today for his brass band pieces although he spent much of his career as a musical director in London’s West End theatres. A prolific composer, he wrote numerous ballads as well as choral works and light orchestral suites. Perhaps his best-remembered piece of light music is the valse-caprice Bal Masque, which was the second of his "Parisian Sketches", composed in 1914 (on Guild GLCD 5108 and 5137).The exhilarating All The Fun Of The Fair comes from his "Rustic Revels" suite. Another movement Dancing On The Green was featured on GLCD5107. His work is a fine example of the high standards achieved by British composers working in Light Music spheres during the first half of the last century.

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5207

Ca C’Est Paris

1 Ca C’Est Paris (Jean Lucien Boyer; Jacques Charles; Jose Padilla)
JOS CLEBER AND HIS COSMOPOLITAN ORCHESTRA
Philips P 10055 R 1954
2 April In Paris (Vernon Duke, arr. Robert Farnon)
ROBERT FARNON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Decca LF 1020 1950
3 En Avril A Paris (Charles Trénet; Walter Eiger)
FRANCK POURCEL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
French HMV 7 EGF 136 1954
4 Tourbillon De Paris (Roger Roger)
ROGER ROGER Conducting THE MODE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Vogue Mode MDINT 9080 1962
5 La Seine (Guy Lafarge, arr. Hal Mooney)
HAL MOONEY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Time S 2005 1960
6 Mademoiselle De Paris (Paul Durand; Eric Maschwitz; Henri Contet)
ART WAINER AND THE LATIN QUARTER ORCHESTRA
MGM D 124 1954
7 Sous Les Toits de Paris (Under The Roofs Of Paris) (Raoul Moretti; René Nazelles)
FRANCK POURCEL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
HMV DLP 1150 1957
8 Sous La Ciel De Paris (Under Paris Skies) (Waltz Of Paree) (Jean Brun; Hubert Giraud)
CYRIL STAPLETON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM E 3206 1955
9 Sous Les Ponts de Paris (Under The Bridges Of Paris) (Vincent Scotto)
FRANCK POURCEL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
HMV DLP 1150 1957
10 An American In Paris (George Gershwin)
DAVID CARROLL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury SML 30022 1961
Paris Original (From "How To Succeed In Show Business Without Really
Trying") (Frank Loessser)
ANDRE KOSTELANETZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Columbia CS 8627 1962
12 Paris Promenade (William Hill Bowen)
THE MELACHRINO ORCHESTRA Conducted by GEORGE MELACHRINO
HMV B 10954 1956
13 Paris Stay The Same (Victor Schertzinger, arr. Jo Boyer)
EDDIE BARCLAY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury MG 20190 1955
14 Paris In The Spring (Mack Gordon; Harry Revel)
HUGO WINTERHALTER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RCA LSP 1904 1959
15 Paris Honeymoon (Laurie Johnson)
GROUP FORTY ORCHESTRA
KPM Music KPM 086 1961
16 Heart Of Paris (Coeur de Mon Coeur) (Georges Auric; Mitchell Parish)
THE CLEBANOFF STRINGS AND ORCHESTRA
Mercury SR 60163 1960
17 Midnight In Paris (Herb Magidson)
ROGER ROGER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Pacific STO-D16005 1962
18 Lovers In Paris (Al Sherman)
MONIA LITER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
London LL 1643 1957
19 Paris Canaille (Leo Ferré, arr. Michel Legrand)
MICHEL LEGRAND AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Philips BBL 7026 1955
20 Rainy Night In Paris (Black)
NORRIE PARAMOR AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Capitol ST 10190 1959
21 Paris Fashions (Cecil Milner)
THE HARMONIC ORCHESTRA Conducted by HANS MAY
Harmonic/Charles Brull HMP 266 1948
22 Paris Oui Oui (David Rose)
DAVID ROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MGM 30521 1952
23 Miss Paris (Roger Roger)
ROGER ROGER AND HIS CHAMPS ELYSEES ORCHESTRA
Chappell C 674 1960
24 Poor People Of Paris (La Goulante du Pauvre Jean) (Marguerite Monnot)
DAVID CARROLL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Mercury SML 30022 1961
25 Paris Soir (Vivian Ellis)
TELECAST ENSEMBLE
Chappell C 561 1957
26 Oh! Paris, Gai Séjour De Plaisir (Charles Lecocq)
GRAND ORCHESTRE DE PARIS Conducted by PAUL BONNEAU
Ducretet-Thomson 250-V-062 1955
27 Lights Of Paris (W. Noack)
LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Bosworth BC 1091 1939
28 I Love Paris (from "Can Can") (Cole Porter)
MONTE CARLO LIGHT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conducted by ERWIN HALLETZ
Polydor 237078 SLPHM 1962

Stereo: tracks 5, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, 20, 24 & 28; rest in mono.

BOOKLET NOTES

The City of Paris was a favoured settlement for our ancestors over two thousand years ago, no doubt due to its position on the River Seine and the rich agricultural conditions in the surrounding area. All this contributed to a pleasant lifestyle, and it was hardly surprising that it became the largest city in the world by the 12th century, a position it retained until other developing nations eventually overtook it in size at the turn of the 18th century. But size is not always everything, and for centuries Paris was at the forefront of Europe’s leading centres of learning and the arts. As such it attracted the best scholars and artists, and this was certainly true in musical terms. Today’s inheritors of this proud tradition still carry on the unique French style that is not afraid to adapt, yet still manages to retain that certain ‘je ne sais crois’. This tribute to Paris confirms the spell it still exerts not only for its own musicians and composers, but also the countless admirers from around the world who have fallen for its charms.

It seems only right that these notes should give precedence to the French musicians performing in this collection, and it would be hard to find a more worthy contender to begin with than Franck Pourcel (1913-2000), who was born in Marseille. He is widely recognised as one of the biggest names in French popular music, and during his lifetime it is estimated that he recorded over 2,000 songs. He achieved world-wide success with I Will Follow Him which he co-composed with Paul Mauriat. It is possible that earlier he may have disappointed some of his loyal fans when he decided to emigrate to the United States in 1952, but he did not desert the country of his birth. He often returned to France to record, and he even conducted for France at the Eurovision Song Contest between 1956 and 1972. He expanded his conducting into the classical arena, but this did not prevent him writing for top singers such as Petula Clark. Air France commissioned him to compose a special piece in 1975 for their Concorde fleet, and his days as an émigré were well behind him when this outstanding conductor, composer and arranger of superlative light orchestral music died at his home in Neuilly-sur-Seine on 12 November 2000 aged 87.

It seems a shame when some musicians get saddled with labels that do not give an accurate description of their achievements. Roger Roger (1911-1995) sometimes gets referred to as a bandleader, but one can think of many true ‘bandleaders’ who come nowhere near Monsieur Roger’s considerable contributions to light and popular music. He started writing for French films towards the end of the 1930s (firstly documentaries, then feature films), and was responsible for the famous pantomime sequences in Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du Paradis (1944). After the Second World War Roger played piano and conducted a 35-piece orchestra for a major French weekly radio series Paris a l’Heure des Etoiles, which was syndicated overseas and even broadcast in the USA. His own instrumental cameos that were featured in the show brought him to the attention of the London publishers Chappell & Co., who were rapidly expanding their Recorded Music Library of background music. Roger’s quirky compositions neatly complemented the kind of music being created at the same time by Chappells’ other top composers, and radio, television and film companies around the world soon appreciated the fresh and, occasionally, unusual sounds he created. Although he was married to the opera singer Eva Rehfuss, Roger is reported not to have liked the human voice. This may explain why he seems to have devoted his career from the 1950s onwards to creating so much purely orchestral material, although he did ‘experiment’ for a while with electronic music in the 1960s, much to the consternation of some of his most avid supporters. In hindsight it is surprising that the post-war French film industry seemed to ignore his talents. Although he made a few commercial recordings, the main thrust of his composing abilities was directed towards the production music libraries of many leading publishers, not just Chappells, and these recordings were only made available to commercial users. The downside of this was that so much of his very appealing work could not be purchased by his admirers.

Eddie Barclay(1921-2005)(real name Edouard Ruault – he changed it in 1944 when he came into contact with American liberation forces) was famous in France for two reasons: his music, and his nine wives. His career took off at the end of World War 2 when he realised that his jazz with a French flavour was much in demand. He launched what he claimed to be the first discothèque, Eddie's Club, based on the American clubs that had opened to serve US military personnel. He certainly came up against the right influences at the right time: he regularly visited the Hot Club of France where Stéphane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt performed. Eddie started his own band in 1947, which accompanied many of the top visiting American artists such as Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie. His list of close friends reads like a ‘Who’s Who’ of top French entertainers, particularly Michel Legrand and Charles Aznavour. Gradually Eddie began extending his talents into conducting and record production for several leading singers, and eventually he formed his own record company. He persuaded his post-war friend Quincy Jones (who had studied in Paris) to come back to France and become artistic director of Barclay Records for a while at the end of the 1950s. Thanks to his strong contacts with the American record industry Eddie Barclay built up a leading role in the production and distribution of LP records in France where he became known as the ‘king of microgroove’.

Michel Jean Legrand (born in Paris 24 February 1932) was one of the first Europeans to work with legendary jazz innovators Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Stan Getz and Bill Evans. This may help to explain why so much of his work has a jazz ‘edge’, although it is also appealing through being beautifully crafted in purely orchestral terms. Whether he is concentrating as a pianist with orchestral backing, or employing the full forces of a symphony-size orchestra for a film score, he manages to create a unique sound that his admirers applaud. Music critics regard him as one of the most important post-war film music composers in the world. He entered the Paris Conservatoire at the age of 10, studying under Nadia Boulanger, whose pupils also included Aaron Copland and Quincy Jones. With his studies behind him, he was chosen by Maurice Chevalier to be Musical Director for his 1954-55 tour of the USA. This opened many doors for young Michel, and ensured that he would not have to worry about finding work for the rest of his life. But his immediate future was back home in France where the 1964 film Les Parapluies de Cherbourg broke new ground with the dialogue being sung. Several songs became international hits, with recordings by the likes of Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and Andy Williams. Eventually Michel Legrand settled in Los Angeles, where his film career blossomed even more, including the title song for the 1983 James Bond movie Never Say Never Again. Legrand has composed over 200 film and television scores, several musicals, and made well over one hundred albums. He has won three Oscars (out of 13 nominations), five Grammys, and has been nominated for an Emmy. He was 22 when his first album, I Love Paris, became one of the best-selling instrumental albums ever released. Apart from his film work, he has conducted many top orchestras around the world.

Paul Bonneau (1918-1995) seems to get categorised as a French composer of classical music, but his name often crops up in connection with light music. He studied at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Paris, where it is noted that he received three important prizes between 1937 and 1945. For much of this time the Second World War was being waged, which could explain why his musical studies seem to have been so extended: in 1939 he became the important-sounding assistant manager of music of the French Army, but one wonders how long this appointment lasted. In 1945 he is listed as bandmaster of the French Republican Guard, but before then he was already conducting light classical music for French radio. His first broadcast was on 27 November 1944, and he went on to conduct 638 programmes over the next 30 years. Paul Bonneau was a prolific composer and arranger. He collaborated on 51 French films and composed serious works such as Ouverture pour un Drame, Concerto for Saxophone and Orchestra and Un Français à New York (for orchestra, dedicated to the memory of George Gershwin). He arranged many light symphonic pieces for orchestra and adapted Offenbach for the Paris Folies operetta in 1976, and seems to have been particularly busy as a ballet composer. His name appears as conductor and composer on many recordings for the French subsidiary of London publishers Chappell & Co.

Having covered the French contributors to this collection in some depth, it is hardly necessary to mention most of the other orchestras since they will already be well-known to regular purchasers of Guild Light Music CDs. But an exception has to be made for the conductor of the opening track, which also gives this collection its title. Jos Cleber (also known as Jozef Cleber and Josef van Cleber, born Maastricht, The Netherlands, 1916-1999) was a Dutch composer and conductor who was only fifteen when he started playing the violin in a local orchestra. He also played the piano, saxophone, clarinet and trombone, and developed a great liking for jazz, no doubt influenced by Duke Ellington, whom he greatly admired. During the Second World War he was part of Paul Godwin’s Orchestra in Zurich, and when hostilities ceased he returned to The Netherlands and played trombone in Dolf van der Linden’s Metropole orchestra. For a while he was also a trombonist in the famous Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra. In June 1948 he travelled to Indonesia, triggering an enduring love of the country and its people (in later years he orchestrated their national anthem). He founded the "Cosmopolitan Orchestra" for Radio Batavia, so named because it composed of 40 musicians of many different nationalities. He worked in Dutch radio until 1962, when he left to settle in South Africa.

In making a special mention of the first orchestra, it would seem only right to praise the conductor who provides such a splendid finale to this collection. Erwin Halletz was born in Vienna on 12 July 1923, and he also died there on 27 October 2008. In addition to conducting, he also performed on the saxophone and clarinet. Like many of his peers in European broadcasting stations at that time, he also found himself called upon to conduct for his country’s entry in the Eurovision Song Contest. In those days it may have been considered an honour, but today …?

David Ades

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GUILD LIGHT MUSIC GLCD5208

The Lost Transcriptions – Volume 4
David Rose and his Orchestra
1 The Tina Lina (Nicholas Brodszky; Johnny Green, arr. David Rose)
World Program Service 466J c.1951
2 On A Misty Day (David Rose)
World Program Service 800-7811 c.1945
3 A Strip of Sunset (David Rose)
World Program Service 800-6200 c.1945
4 Oh! You Horses (David Rose)
Standard Radio Transcription Services Z 154-3 c.1942
5 Birth Of The Blues (from "George White’s Scandals") (Ray Henderson; Lew Brown; Buddy De Sylva, arr. David Rose)
Standard Radio Transcription Services Z-162-3 c.1942
Mantovani and his Orchestra
6 Brass Hats (Guy Desslyn, real name Frederic Bayco)
Lang-Worth Feature Programs PC 137A 1952
7 Caprice Viennois (Fritz Kreisler)
Lang-Worth Feature Programs PC 122B 1952
8 Cuban Holiday (Donald Phillips)
Lang-Worth Feature Programs PC 124B 1952
9 Danse Drole (Michael Spivakovsky)
Lang-Worth Feature Programs PC 137A 1952
10 Loop-De-Loo (Vic Mizzy)
Lang-Worth Feature Programs PC 124A 1952

…………………..

11 Nocturnal Mood (Emil Cadkin)
CARL CHANDLER AND HIS ORCHESTRA (real name Emil Cadkin)
Standard Z-253-2 1949
12 It Wouldn’t Be Love (Allan Roberts; Buddy Bernier)
HOLLYWOOD SALON ORCHESTRA Conducted by HARRY BLUESTONE
Standard T-240-4 1949
13 The Minute Waltz (Chopin arr. Emil Cadkin)
CARL CHANDLER AND HIS ORCHESTRA (real name Emil Cadkin)
Standard Z-268-6 1949
14 Hindustan (Harold Weeks)
CARMEN DRAGON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
World Programme Service (Australia) 108 c.1945

……………………

Sidney Torch and his Orchestra
15 Long Ago And Far Away (from "Cover Girl") (Jerome Kern, arr. Sidney Torch)
Lang-Worth PC 86A c.1952
16 On The Trail (from "Grand Canyon Suite") (Ferdé Grofé)
Lang-Worth PC 132A c.1952
17 La Calinda (Frederick Delius)
Lang-Worth PC 134A c.1952
18 Syncopated Clock (Leroy Anderson)
Lang-Worth PC 88A c.1952
Percy Faith and his Orchestra
I Can’t Get Started With You (From "Ziegfeld Follies of 1936")(Vernon Duke;
Ira Gershwin, arr. Percy Faith)
VOA PO 103 1948
20 Oodles Of Noodles (Jimmy Dorsey) Solo Saxophone VINCENT J. ABATO
VOA PO 96 1948
21 The Snow Goose (Percy Faith) Solo Piano STAN FREEMAN
AFRS "Melody Hour" Programme 1946
22 Tears On Satin (Johnny Richards) Solo Harmonica RICHARD HAYMAN
VOA PO 117 1948
23 Two Silhouettes (From the film "Make Mine Music") (Charles Woolcott,
arr. Percy Faith)
AFRS "Melody Hour" Programme 1946
The Irish Washerwoman (Trad. arr. Percy Faith)
VOA PO 105 1948

All titles mono

BOOKLET NOTES

Sound recordings provide a fascinating subject to study for anyone interested in the development of music in recent times. By the beginning of the 20th century it was possible to enjoy the early acoustic recordings, without continually being aware of the limitations of the system. In the mid-1920s electrical recording proved to be a giant leap forward in terms of reproduction, and subsequent advances in technology have made it possible for listeners to enjoy superb sound whenever and wherever they wish. It is, perhaps, a pity that the small portable devices so common today have actually resulted in a deterioration in sound quality, but it is up to the user to decide what is acceptable.

For many people sound recordings probably just mean commercial recordings, offered for sale by record companies who have strived to anticipate what their potential customers will be willing to buy. The first three quarters of the last century witnessed the growth of major recording organisations around the world, sometimes linked to music publishers and other associated interests. In the early days the creators of the music seemed to have been largely in control; in later years the accountants took over, with the result that true music lovers often felt that their desires meant little to those in charge. Fortunately a number of small independent companies tended to surface as the 20th century drew to a close, often sustained by the enthusiasm of dedicated collectors anxious to preserve what they regarded as the glory years of recorded music.

Alongside the familiar commercial gramophone records, a large number of recordings were also being made to serve the needs of various sections of the entertainment business. The general public was blissfully unaware of the existence of this vast reservoir of music, although they were frequently exposed to it. Today it is often labelled ‘production music’ or ‘stock music’; in earlier times it was ‘mood’, or ‘background’ music, and it often came from the music publishers themselves who wanted their music to be used in the cinema, radio, television, newsreels, documentaries – in fact anywhere that music could play a useful part. Some larger radio stations also made special programmes to offer to other broadcasters around the world, who maybe couldn’t afford the cost of some of these lavish productions. These were usually referred to as ‘Transcriptions’.

Sadly many of these were not highly regarded at the time. Although standards generally were high, they were frequently unkindly dismissed as ‘passing fancies’ that would serve a useful purpose, and then be forgotten. Often they were supposed to be destroyed after use, but fortunately for us some collectors who could appreciate their musicality decided that such a fate was surely too cruel. (Without wishing to complicate the story too much, it should be mentioned at this point that the Second World War also required a large amount of transcription recordings to entertain troops far away from home, and specialist organisations grew up to supply them).

Today many historic sound recordings are under threat due to copyright regulations which can only be described as deplorable. Unless the original legal owners are willing to fund the necessary work involved, dedicated restorers are hampered by regulations which prohibit them from working to save deteriorating precious recordings that are part of our musical heritage. Reports from concerned sources within the USA suggest that some early sound recordings are ‘locked away’ for up to 177 years. One cannot believe that this was intended by legislators, and it can only be assumed that law makers have been poorly advised by the people who should be ensuring that they make correct and sensible decisions. In Europe the period for ‘locking away’ sound recordings ignored by the copyright holders has been increased from 50 to 70 years, despite every learned study into the question ruling against such a retrograde step. This is all happening when the internet has made it virtually impossible to police all forms of copyright. Every day hundreds of thousands of pieces of music, and literary works, are made available to the world without any thought as to what the creators deserve to receive from the fruits of their labours.

This collection of transcription recordings, which has been produced carefully to observe all applicable copyright laws, is an example of the essential work that should be done all over the world to preserve the music that has played such an important part in the lives of us all.

Four leading Light Orchestras provide the lion’s share of the music in this collection. In each case they have enjoyed international success with their numerous commercial recordings, and it may come as a surprise to some of their admirers to learn that they were actively involved in making transcription recordings. Their contributions to this CD were not issued commercially when originally recorded.

David Rose was born on 15 June 1910 in London, England, and the family moved to the USA when he was just four-years-old. After leaving the Chicago College of Music at the age of 16, he eventually became a pianist/ arranger/ conductor for NBC Radio. He moved to Hollywood, and in 1938 formed his own orchestra for the Mutual Broadcasting System, and featured on the programme "California Melodies". In 1943 he had a big hit with his own composition Holiday For Strings which firmly launched him as a light music composer in the eyes of the public. By the late '40s he was a regular on Red Skelton's radio show, moving with him into television. He later wrote scores and themes for over 20 television series and won Emmy awards for his 14 year stint on "Bonanza", 10 years with "Little House On The Prairie" and his work on three much-acclaimed Fred Astaire specials. Rose began working in movies in 1941 and is credited with scoring 36 films. After chart success with Calypso Melody in 1957, Rose had a worldwide smash hit in 1962 with another of his own tunes, a humorous and satirical piece called The Stripper. In total he won five Grammy awards and six gold records. Apart from his record, film and television work, Rose was guest conductor with several symphony orchestras. His Concerto For Flute And Orchestra was first played by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra and later by the Boston Pops. Towards the end of his life his enduring passion was miniature steam trains, which ran on 900 feet of track around his house. Rose died on 23 August 1990, at his home in Burbank, California, aged 80.

Annunzio Paolo Mantovani was born in Venice, Italy on 15 November 1905. His father was principal violinist at La Scala, Milan, with the legendary Arturo Toscanini. Although details are difficult to confirm, Mantovani always maintained that he came to England when aged only four, and it is believed that he may have accompanied his father who was playing with a touring Italian opera company which performed at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in 1909. The family seems to have settled permanently in England in 1912. During his formal studies at Trinity College he excelled on the violin, but the young Mantovani showed leanings towards the popular music of the day, and he embarked upon a career that was typical for many aspiring musicians in the early years of the last century. His studies had equipped him well as both a violinist and pianist, and it was not long before he became proficient at composing and arranging. Living in the capital city there were plenty of opportunities for work in restaurants, hotels and theatres, and while still in his teens he realised that conducting was another skill that came easily to him. In 1923 he took a quintet into the Midland Hotel in Birmingham; by 1925 he was at London’s Metropole Hotel where one of his players was another talented youngster who would one day become one of the most famous light music conductors alongside Mantovani – none other than George Melachrino. By 1932 his name was starting to be recognised by music lovers: it was in this year that he began his series of popular recordings conducting his Tipica Orchestra. Gradually his recorded repertoire expanded to include pieces of concert-style light music, and this laid the foundations for the large orchestra, with the emphasis on strings, that was to bring him universal acclaim from the early 1950s onwards. This has ensured his well-deserved place in the history of popular music.

Sidney Torch (1908-1990) was born Sidney Torchinsky, of Ukranian parents at 27 Tottenham Court Road, in London’s West End. For decades he was well-known in Britain for his numerous Parlophone recordings, as well as his long tenure as conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra in the "Friday Night Is Music Night" BBC radio programme. Prior to the Second World War he was one of Britain’s finest theatre organists. After war service in the Royal Air Force, where he conducted the RAF Concert Orchestra, he made a complete break from playing the organ and concentrated entirely on composing, arranging and conducting light music. Towards the end of his life he was awarded the MBE, but sadly did not seem to enjoy a happy retirement. He had no children, and his wife pre-deceased him. In his will the beneficiary of all his royalties was the Cancer Relief MacMillan Fund. He has left behind a wealth of recordings: some feature him purely as a very accomplished conductor who could handle anything required by broadcasters from the light classics to popular melodies of the day. But his admirers are also grateful for the magnificently crafted light music cameos that continue to delight listeners more than fifty years after he composed them. Alongside this treasure-house of individual works are the many pieces by others that he orchestrated so beautifully. He was truly a very gifted musician, and one hopes that music lovers fifty or one hundred years from now will still have the opportunity to explore his legacy.

Percy Faith was born in Toronto, Canada, on 7 April 1908, and originally he expected that his musical career would be as a concert pianist. But he injured his hands in a fire, which forced him to turn to composing, arranging and conducting. During the 1930s his programme "Music By Faith" was carried by the Mutual Network in the USA, which prompted offers of work south of the border. He eventually succumbed in 1940, leaving Robert Farnon (previously his lead trumpeter) to conduct his Canadian orchestra. Initially Faith concentrated on broadcasting, and his occasional recording sessions during the 1940s were for several different companies. Things were to change when he signed a Columbia (CBS) contract in 1950, and he soon discovered that his singles sold well and the new long playing records needed the kind of popular instrumental sounds that had formed the basis of his broadcasts for so many years. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Faith arranged all his own material, and his exciting and vibrant scores made his work stand out among the rest. He accompanied many of Columbia’s contract singers, and even contributed the odd popular song, such as My Heart Cries For You for Guy Mitchell. But today it is his numerous albums that have created a resurgence of interest in his work, thanks to their reissue on CD. Faith was always busy, whether working in the recording studios, radio, television or films. He died at Encino, California, on 9 February 1976, aged 67.

The three remaining conductors were also very active in the specialised area of the music business involved in the making of transcription recordings.

Emil M. Cadkin, who used the pseudonym ‘Carl Chandler’, is an American composer and conductor of Russian descent, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1920. At the end of the 1930s he was in Los Angeles writing and teaching music, and he enlisted in the USAF in 1942. Back in civilian life he seems to have spent many years providing ‘stock’ or ‘production’ music for various third rate film studios, but eventually he gained a position as musical director and arranger for Columbia Pictures and Screen Gems. He was certainly prolific: his name crops up in many films, television shows and as a composer of stock music, sometimes in collaboration with others such as Harry Bluestone (see below) and William Loose (1910-1991).

Harry Bluestone (1907-1992) was born in England, but he made his successful career in the USA where he composed and conducted music for films and television, often alongside some of the busiest ‘backroom boys’ in the business.

Carmen Dragon (1914-1984) was born in Antioch, California. His first success in Hollywood was collaborating with Morris Stoloff (1898-1980) arranging Jerome Kern’s score for the 1944 Rita Hayworth/Gene Kelly film "Cover Girl" which secured him an Oscar. He worked extensively in radio and television, and was a frequent visitor to recording studios conducting the Hollywood Bowl and Capitol Symphony Orchestras. He also arranged and conducted for the Standard School Broadcast Transcription Service, and his version of San Francisco (which cleverly includes brief snatches related to the Californian city’s cosmopolitan population) was included on GLCD5180.

David Ades

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THE FINEST COLLECTION EVER OF DEFINITIVE ERIC COATES RECORDINGS

A new box set from Nimbus promises to be the outstanding Light Music release of 2013 – if not the decade. Every commercial recording of Eric Coates conducting his own compositions has been collected together on 7 CDs, from his earliest acoustics in 1923 to his final sessions in 1957.

This is the brainchild of Alan Bunting, who has been working on this ‘labour of love’ for the best part of the last year. The sound restorations are all outstanding, which is hardly surprising when you consider that Alan is widely recognised as one of the finest digital ‘wizards’ in the world. He has gone to great lengths to obtain the very best copies available of the original discs, calling upon the willing participation of his many contacts in the record collecting fraternity. Sometimes he has had to reject some old 78s, and redouble his efforts to find better copies. The result is that the work of Eric Coates has now been preserved in amazing quality that would not have been possible only a few years ago. There are instances of Coates revisiting some of his earlier works to record them again when better technology became available, following the advent of electrical sound recording. And for the sake of completion a few tracks feature other orchestras playing Coates’ works, where he did not conduct them himself.

Originally Alan worked on this project without knowing for sure if it would ever be offered to record buyers by a commercial company. He simply felt that it was something that ought to be done, in recognition of Eric Coates’ magnificent contribution to the Light Music repertoire of the 20th Century. But always at the back of his mind Alan hoped that, one day, he might be able to convince a record company to release his restorations. At one time there was a vague possibility that the 7 discs might be issued singly over a period of several months, but this would have been considered only as a last resort.

Happily the English company Nimbus enthusiastically embraced the project, and the results have exceeded Alan’s wildest expectations. They have they produced a top quality product in all respects at a very reasonable price (internet retailers are offering the 7 CDs for little more than £20). The accompanying booklet features an extended essay by Michael Payne, the author of the recent published book ‘The Life And Music Of Eric Coates’ (Ashgate Publishing Ltd.).

The Definitive Eric Coates" Nimbus NI 6131

This appeared in the August 2013 issue of ‘Journal Into Melody’

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About Geoff 123
Geoff Leonard was born in Bristol. He spent much of his working career in banking but became an independent record producer in the early nineties, specialising in the works of John Barry and British TV theme compilations.
He also wrote liner notes for many soundtrack albums, including those by John Barry, Roy Budd, Ron Grainer, Maurice Jarre and Johnny Harris. He co-wrote two biographies of John Barry in 1998 and 2008, and is currently working on a biography of singer, actor, producer Adam Faith.
He joined the Internet Movie Data-base (www.imdb.com) as a data-manager in 2001 and looked after biographies, composers and the music-department, amongst other tasks. He retired after nine years loyal service in order to continue writing.